The Best High Powered EV Chargers Of 2023. Wall charger ev

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Charger Types and Speeds

EVs can be charged using electric vehicle service equipment (EVSE) operating at different charging speeds.

Level 1

Level 1 equipment provides charging through a common residential 120-volt (120V) AC outlet. Level 1 chargers can take 40-50 hours to charge a BEV to 80 percent from empty and 5-6 hours for a PHEV.

Level 2

Level 2 equipment offers higher-rate AC charging through 240V (in residential applications) or 208V (in commercial applications) electrical service, and is common for home, workplace, and public charging. Level 2 chargers can charge a BEV to 80 percent from empty in 4-10 hours and a PHEV in 1-2 hours.

Direct Current Fast Charging (DCFC)

Direct current fast charging (DCFC) equipment offers Rapid charging along heavy-traffic corridors at installed stations. DCFC equipment can charge a BEV to 80 percent in just 20 minutes to 1 hour. Most PHEVs currently on the market do not work with fast chargers.

Level 2 and DCFC equipment has been deployed at various public locations including, for example, at grocery stores, theaters, or coffee shops. When selecting a charger type, consider its voltages, resulting charging and vehicle dwell times, and estimated up-front and ongoing costs.

The figure below shows typical Level 2 and DCFC charging stations 1.

EV Charging Minimum Standards Rule

FHWA, with support from the Joint Office of Energy Transportation, unveiled new national standards for federally funded EV chargers in February 2023. These new standards aim to ensure that charging is a predictable and reliable experience for EV drivers. This includes ensuring that drivers can easily find a charger, do not need multiple apps and/or accounts to charge, chargers work when drivers need them to, and are designed to be compatible in the future with forward-looking charging capabilities.

The rule establishes minimum technical standards for charging stations, including required number of charging ports, connector types, power level, availability, payment methods, uptime/reliability, EV charger infrastructure network connectivity, and interoperability, among other standards and requirements.

Overview of EV Chargers

The below table summarizes the typical power output, charging time, and locations for PHEVs and BEVs for the different charger types. For more information on the power requirements of different chargers, see the Utility Planning section of the toolkit.

1 Note that charging speed is affected by many factors, including the charger manufacturer, condition, and age; air temperature; vehicle battery capacity; and vehicle age and condition.

2 Different vehicles have different charge ports. For DCFC, the Combined Charging System (CCS) connector is based on an open international standard and is common on vehicles manufactured in North America and Europe; the CHArge de Move (CHAdeMO) connector is most common for Japanese manufactured vehicles. Tesla vehicles have a unique connector that works for all charging speeds, including at Tesla’s “Supercharger” DCFC stations, while non-Tesla vehicles require adapters at these stations.

3 AC = alternating current; DC = direct current.

4 Assuming an 8-kWh battery; most plug-in hybrids do not work with fast chargers.

6 To 80 percent charge. Charging speed slows as the battery gets closer to full to prevent damage to the battery. Therefore, it is more cost- and time-efficient for EV drivers to use direct current (DC) fast charging until the battery reaches 80 percent, and then continue on their trip. It can take about as long to charge the last 10 percent of an EV battery as the first 90 percent.

Our top four 48-amp EV charger recommendations for 2023

Choosing the best home electric vehicle charger can be a daunting task. Only a few years ago there were just a handful of offerings, but now there are dozens. The good news is we did all the work for you, and relentlessly reviewed dozens of chargers to bring you our top picks for the best EV chargers of 2023.

Unlike some of the other outlets that offer their top picks, we actually do deep-dive reviews and use the units to charge many different electric vehicles before publishing our comprehensive EV charger reviews. We also compare and rate the chargers against comparable units, and don’t lump all of the chargers into one pool and compare apples to oranges.

For that reason, we’re breaking our Best Of 2023 series into three parts, and we’re starting off here with the best highpowered 48-amp EV chargers of 2023.

WallBox Pulsar Plus 48 Key Features

WallBox Pulsar Plus: 699.00

The WallBox Pulsar Plus is an extremely compact charger, by far the smallest 48-amp charger that we have ever tested. It’s an extremely capable Wi-Fi connected Smart charger that also has the ability to power charge between units.

That’s a great feature to have if you have two or more electric vehicles in your garage because you can use one 60-amp circuit to power two chargers and the Pulsar Plus chargers will intelligently split the power between units so you don’t overload the circuit.

ChargePoint Home Flex Key Features

The ChargePoint Home Flex: 749.00

The ChargePoint Home Flex has been one of the top-selling home EV charging solutions for the past three years. It’s the second generation of ChargePoint’s Home products and a stylish highpowered charger.

Its led-backlit integrated connector holster swivels to make holstering the connector easy and it has the best cable for cold weather installations that we have ever tested. Even in temperatures well below freezing, the ChargePoint Home Flex’s cable remains flexible and easy to manipulate.

The ChargePoint Home Flex would have been a contender for the top spot if it weren’t for its high price of 749.00.

Emporia Charger Key Features

#1(Tie) Best For Non-Tesla EV: Emporia EVSE: 399.00

The Emporia EVSE is our top choice for highpowered EV chargers for a number of reasons. Like the other units, it is a Wi-Fi-connected Smart charger that comes with an app to monitor charging, start and stop a charging session, schedule delayed charging and review data from past charging sessions.

It can also charge your EV exclusively from excess solar generation if you have a solar array and purchase Emporia’s VUE 2 energy monitoring device.

However, the biggest reason it’s our top pick is the price. At 399, it is the least expensive 48-amp charger available today that is also safety certified, a must for us to recommend a charger.

Tesla Wall Connector Key Features

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(Tie) Best For Tesla Vehicles: Tesla Wall Connector: 425.00

The Tesla Wall Connector is the best-selling electric vehicle charger on the market today and Tesla has sold more than one million of them to date. Since it has the native Tesla connector attached, there’s no need to use an adapter, and while adapters work fine, we prefer EV owners use them on occasion when they need to and not for daily charging.

best, high, powered, chargers

The Tesla connector will also open and close the charge flap on Tesla vehicles, another advantage of using a proper Tesla connector. The Wall Connector can also accept OTA upgrades and remote diagnostics via Wi-Fi and can power charge with up to six Wall Connectors.

Scoring

We use our proprietary ChargerRater scorecard that has five different categories for a point-based score and then factor in our personal opinion after using the unit for two to three weeks and charging at least three different electric vehicles with the chargers.

The ChargerRater scorecards for our top four 48A EV charger picks

Coming Soon

Next up in the Best Of 2023 series will be our Best of 40-amp chargers, followed by our top pics for Best Portable Chargers of 2023, so keep an eye out for those articles soon.

Let us know what you’re using to charge your EV in the comment section below and what you like and dislike about the unit.

What Are the Differences Between Electric Vehicle Chargers?

If you’re planning to buy an electric vehicle, you should know about the differences between the charger connector types.

best, high, powered, chargers

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Instead, automakers have largely converged on a small handful of different designs. Before upgrading to an electric car yourself, review these different type of charging connectors that let you siphon that sweet, sweet electricity.

Electric Car Charging Connectors Vary By Manufacturer and Charging Speed

As most major automakers now field at least one pure electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid, automakers have had to decide which type of charging port to adopt. The results have largely been in support of a universal standard.

That isn’t a blanket truth, however, and how true it is largely depends on the brand of EV and which tier of charging speed you’re talking about. As we’ve written about before, electric car charging speeds break down into three distinct categories: Level 1 charging, Level 2 charging, and Level 3 charging.

A quick recap on charging speeds: Level 1 charging is when you plug into any ordinary 120V wall outlet. Level 2 typically represents 240V charging and is often facilitated by a dedicated wall charger that you likely need to purchase and have professionally installed. Level 3 charging refers to the fast-charging stations that can juice up a drained battery in just an hour or two.

Charging Connectors for Level 1 and Level 2 Charging

When it comes to EV charging connectors, Level 1 and Level 2 chargers are nearly universal. In the U.S, every automaker save for Tesla uses what’s known as the J1772 connector for Level 1 and 2 charging.

The J1772 connector is a circular five-pin design that features three larger pins and two smaller ones. Look around, and you’ll likely find that these are connectors being used at all your local charging locations, such as the EV charger that may be offered at your local supermarket or town hall.

Related: Electric Vehicle Companies That Are Breaking New Ground If Elon Musk fans want to use an EV charger equipped with a J1772 connector, they’ll need a special adaptor, as Tesla continues to use a proprietary charge port not shared with any other automaker. Luckily, these adaptor cables are included with the purchase of any new Tesla.

Charging Connectors for Level 3 Charging

As we mentioned, Level 3 charging is the big league—the quickest charging option out there by a wide margin. As such, hooking up to one of these fast chargers requires a unique cable that can’t be shared with Level 1 and Level 2 charging stations. Automakers currently use one of three main charging connectors for Level 3 charging.

The most common connector type for Level 3 charging is what’s known as the CCS charger. Short for Combined Charging System, the CCS charge port is essentially a modified J1772 connector; it augments an additional two-pin connector below the standard J1772 five-pin design. This connector is currently used by all automakers except for Nissan, Mitsubishi, and Tesla.

Nissan and Mitsubishi are the only two automakers in the U.S to use what’s known as the CHAdeMO charge port. Like the charger design itself, the name comes from Japan; it’s an abbreviation of “Charge de Move,” which itself was derived from the Japanese phrase “O cha demo ikaga desuka.”

If you haven’t brushed up on your Japanese recently, that translates to “How about tea?” The idea is that charging your electric car at a Level 3 charger offers the perfect amount of time to enjoy a fresh brew before you and your car are both topped off and ready to hit the road again.

In Japan, the CHAdeMo is the universal standard at Level 3 fast-charge stations, but only Nissan and Mitsubishi have brought the technology to the U.S. Rather than require an adaptor, EVs from these two manufacturers feature two plugs behind their filler doors; one accepts the CHAdeMo connector, while the other receives the CCS type.

Tesla being Tesla, it hasn’t adopted either CHAdeMo or CCS connectors; instead, it uses its own exclusive fast-charger connector design that’s only compatible with Tesla vehicles. You’ll find these Level 3 connectors at the brand’s Supercharger stations that are located along most major interstates across the country.

If a Tesla driver wants to enjoy the speed of Level 3 charging and isn’t near a Supercharger, they can use an adaptor that works with the CHAdeMO type connector.

Of the major independent charging networks—including EVGo, ChargePoint, and Electrify America—all offer access to both CCS and CHAdeMO connectors. That means you can fast-charge any EV at their locations, including a Tesla, provided you have the correct adaptor.

It’s also worth noting that certain EVgo chargers are equipped with the correct Tesla connector, making it the only independent charging network to offer the proprietary Tesla charging hardware.

Three Primary Fast Charger Types Provide Wide-Scale Compatibility

No matter what EV you choose to buy, you’ll find that your charging connector options will boil down to one of just a few different designs. The most common connector? The J1772. Unless you buy a Tesla, this is the connector you’ll want to get familiar with. Expect to use it for all Level 1 and Level 2 charging.

If you’re interested in Level 3 charging, you’ll likely be using the CCS connector. It’s a modified J1772 design and is used on all new EVs aside from those built by Tesla, Mitsubishi, and Nissan. Of those three nonconforming brands, the latter two are sticking with the CHAdeMO design, a Level 3 connector which is the industry standard in Japan but is overshadowed by the CCS design both in the U.S and in Europe.

Tesla continues to hold fast to its proprietary design, though it does offer a CHAdeMO adaptor for when a Supercharger station isn’t within range.

The bottom line of all this? You’ll need to be cognizant of the charger type your EV requires, but there’s no need to worry about whether you bought a car with CHAdeMO or CCS. The charging infrastructure currently supports all charging connectors, so you’ll have no issue juicing up regardless if you drive a Nissan Leaf or Tesla Model S.

In This Section

If you are deaf, hard of hearing, or have a speech disability, please dial 7-1-1 to access telecommunications relay services.

Charger Types and Speeds

EVs can be charged using electric vehicle service equipment (EVSE) operating at different charging speeds.

Level 1

Level 1 equipment provides charging through a common residential 120-volt (120V) AC outlet. Level 1 chargers can take 40-50 hours to charge a BEV to 80 percent from empty and 5-6 hours for a PHEV.

Level 2

Level 2 equipment offers higher-rate AC charging through 240V (in residential applications) or 208V (in commercial applications) electrical service, and is common for home, workplace, and public charging. Level 2 chargers can charge a BEV to 80 percent from empty in 4-10 hours and a PHEV in 1-2 hours.

Direct Current Fast Charging (DCFC)

Direct current fast charging (DCFC) equipment offers Rapid charging along heavy-traffic corridors at installed stations. DCFC equipment can charge a BEV to 80 percent in just 20 minutes to 1 hour. Most PHEVs currently on the market do not work with fast chargers.

Level 2 and DCFC equipment has been deployed at various public locations including, for example, at grocery stores, theaters, or coffee shops. When selecting a charger type, consider its voltages, resulting charging and vehicle dwell times, and estimated up-front and ongoing costs.

The figure below shows typical Level 2 and DCFC charging stations 1.

EV Charging Minimum Standards Rule

FHWA, with support from the Joint Office of Energy Transportation, unveiled new national standards for federally funded EV chargers in February 2023. These new standards aim to ensure that charging is a predictable and reliable experience for EV drivers. This includes ensuring that drivers can easily find a charger, do not need multiple apps and/or accounts to charge, chargers work when drivers need them to, and are designed to be compatible in the future with forward-looking charging capabilities.

The rule establishes minimum technical standards for charging stations, including required number of charging ports, connector types, power level, availability, payment methods, uptime/reliability, EV charger infrastructure network connectivity, and interoperability, among other standards and requirements.

Overview of EV Chargers

The below table summarizes the typical power output, charging time, and locations for PHEVs and BEVs for the different charger types. For more information on the power requirements of different chargers, see the Utility Planning section of the toolkit.

1 Note that charging speed is affected by many factors, including the charger manufacturer, condition, and age; air temperature; vehicle battery capacity; and vehicle age and condition.

2 Different vehicles have different charge ports. For DCFC, the Combined Charging System (CCS) connector is based on an open international standard and is common on vehicles manufactured in North America and Europe; the CHArge de Move (CHAdeMO) connector is most common for Japanese manufactured vehicles. Tesla vehicles have a unique connector that works for all charging speeds, including at Tesla’s “Supercharger” DCFC stations, while non-Tesla vehicles require adapters at these stations.

3 AC = alternating current; DC = direct current.

4 Assuming an 8-kWh battery; most plug-in hybrids do not work with fast chargers.

6 To 80 percent charge. Charging speed slows as the battery gets closer to full to prevent damage to the battery. Therefore, it is more cost- and time-efficient for EV drivers to use direct current (DC) fast charging until the battery reaches 80 percent, and then continue on their trip. It can take about as long to charge the last 10 percent of an EV battery as the first 90 percent.

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