Lightest 20000mah power bank. Lightest 20000mah power bank

The Best Power Banks of 2023, Tested and Reviewed

If I have the choice between a device that uses conventional batteries or one that uses rechargeable batteries, I’ll always go with rechargeable. But that means I need to maintain that device, which is why a portable power bank comes with me on nearly every trip. Over the past month, I’ve tested a dozen of the top rated power banks, and from that initial pool, I’ve narrowed it down to the six best power banks.

It doesn’t matter if I’m spending time outdoors or traveling, I’ll need to recharge something, and will inevitably use a power bank. My picks for the best power banks have been used while in the outdoors as well as for everyday use and holiday travel. They’ve juiced up headlamps, GoPros, my iPhone, and even other power banks. After all that field testing, here are my findings and recommendations for the best power banks.

  • Best Overall:Anker PowerCore Slim 10,000 mAh
  • Best Solar:BigBlue 28-Watt Solar Charger
  • Best for Fishing:Anker Solar
  • Best Small:Goal Zero Flip 12
  • Best for Backpacking:Anker PowerCore Essential 20,000 mAh
  • Best for iPhones:Anker Powercore Magnetic 5K

How I Tested the Power Banks

I tested the power banks in three ways: First, I timed how long it takes them to fully charge and how many times they fully charged my iPhone 11 Max. Then over a one-month period I carried these portable chargers during outdoor activities in several states, on long road trips, and a fishing trip in North Carolina. During that month I subjected them to heat, cold, and water to test their durability. Finally, I weighed and measured each power bank to provide you with accurate specs.

Here are the attributes I used to evaluate the power banks:

lightest, 20000mah, power, bank
  • As advertised (Do the chargers do what the manufacturer advertises?)
  • Number of charges and charge time (How many times does it charge a phone? How long does it take to charge?)
  • Use in the field (Is it practical to use while hunting, fishing, camping, hiking or backpacking?)
  • Durability (Can it hold up to abuse?)
  • Weight (Ounces are pounds, and pounds are pain.)

Best Overall: Anker PowerCore Slim 10,000 mAh

Key Features

  • 10,000 mAh
  • 3-hour charge time
  • Charges an iPhone twice
  • One USB port
  • Micro USB and USB-C input
  • Weight: 8.4 ounces
  • Length: 6 inches
  • Width: 2.75 inches
  • Depth:.5 inch

Product Overview

If you’re looking for an all-around solution, consider the PowerCore 10,000 mAh. It’s a happy medium between a small charger like the Goal Zero Flip 12 and the PowerCore 20,000 mAh. If you are going out for the day or an overnight trip, it provides plenty of juice with two phone charges. It’s also light and small enough to not take up space in a pack or

The Anker PowerCore went through three key tests: a timed charge, testing how many times it would charge my iPhone 11 Pro Max, and using the power bank in the field. One of my favorite features of this power bank is how fast it charges. In a few hours, you can bring it from dead to fully juiced and ready to hit the field. It’s fast charging ability also makes it an excellent candidate to pair with a solar panel like the BigBlue 24 watt.

In my testing, the Anker PowerCore charged my phone twice. That’s two times with the phone on and in use. So, if you keep your phone off while it’s charging, you can expect the power bank to last longer—Anker rates it at two-and-a-quarter iPhone 12 charges. I most often use this charger when I’m going to be out all day and will need to charge my phone once, along with another device like a GoPro. It would also be ideal for a two-to.three day camping trip where you need to charge your phone twice.

The Anker PowerCore is slim and light enough that you can carry it in a for everyday carry. It’s also perfect for carrying in a daypack or sling bag. Mine has been with me hunting, fishing, and traveling—it’s yet to let me down.

Best Solar: BigBlue 28-Watt Solar Charger

Key Features

  • 25 Watt
  • 3 USB ports
  • Charges a phone in about 3 hours of full sun
  • Charges a 10,000 mAh power bank in 6 hours
  • Weight: 1 pound 9 ounces
  • Length: 11.125 inches
  • Width: 6 inches
  • Depth: 1.375 inches
  • Size

Product Overview

There are a lot of portable solar chargers on the market, and they range in price as much as they do in effectiveness. The BigBlue is the best solar power charger that actually works and it’s affordable. You have to manage your expectations when it comes to these small solar panels and while three hours to bring a phone to full charge seems like a lot, I think it’s pretty impressive.

Here’s the context of my testing. I tested this solar panel in the fall when the sun sits low in the sky. The first hour of the charge the panel received partial sun. I managed the position of the panel throughout the day to keep it aligned with the sun.

The first test was to see how long it took to charge a Goal Zero Flip 12, which is good for one full phone charge. That test took three hours, which is how long it takes to charge the Flip 12 when plugged into the wall. The next test was to see how long it takes to charge my pick for the best power bank, the PowerCore 10,000 mAh. After six hours in the sun the power bank was at full power.

When you’re in the field, you probably don’t have time to sit around for six hours waiting for a power bank to charge. But, that’s not the best way to use this charger. In my opinion, using the solar panel to maintain battery life rather than fully charge a device is the best use. For example, if you are glassing in the morning, you can roll out your solar charger and plug in a device. Let’s say you stay put for just an hour, that’s enough time to charge a phone 30 percent. By charging your devices a little at a time throughout your time in the field you can make your powerbank or batteries last much longer.

Best for Fishing: Anker Solar

Key Features

  • Water resistant
  • Solar charging
  • 20,000 mAh
  • Two USB ports
  • One USB-C port
  • Needs to be charged overnight
  • Charges a phone four times
  • Weight: 1 pound
  • Length: 6.875 inches
  • Width: 3.625 inches
  • Depth: 1.125 inches
  • Takes a long time to fully charge
  • Heavy

Product Description

I used the Anker Solar on a few upland bird hunting trips and a trip chasing false albacore in North Carolina making this the best power bank for fishing. While chasing albies, we had one bad weather day with a lot of chop. If I wasn’t wearing a rain suit, I would have been drenched. The Anker Solar was subjected to the same salt spray and it handled it just fine. It also had plenty of power to keep my phone, and GoPros fully charged during the ten hours of fishing. After I got off the boat, I grabbed a quick dinner before heading out on kayaks for fishing dock lights at night. That few hours wasn’t enough time to get the Anker Solar back to even half charge, which is the main downside.

If you plan to use this charger for backpacking or hunting, the weight and bulk are something to consider. The Anker PowerCore 20,000 mAh is considerably lighter and smaller, but it lacks the solar charging and weather protection the Anker Solar offers. Personally, I’d rather take the PowerCore for those applications, and think the Solar shines for fishing applications.

One of the questions you probably have is: does the solar panel on this powerbank work? If you plan to use the solar panel to fully charge your power bank, you’ll be waiting a while. I tested the solar charging capabilities by placing the power bank in full sun for six hours and did not see a measurable difference in charge. However, I think if you keep this charger in the sun all day, the battery will last longer than if you didn’t have the solar panel. So, consider it more of a battery extender, rather than a charger like the BigBlue.

Best Small: Goal Zero Flip 12

Key Features

  • 3,350 mAh
  • One USB port
  • One full phone charge
  • Three-hour charge time
  • Weight: 2.6 ounces
  • Length: 3.75 inches
  • Width:.625 inch
  • Depth:.625 inch

Why it Made the Cut

This power bank weighs nothing, has a small footprint, and has enough juice to completely charge your phone.

Product Description

This Goal Zero small power bank won’t take up space in your pack and has enough juice to bring your phone from dead to fully charged. For overnight or day trips, it’s my top choice. I also like keeping this best small charger in my carry-on to keep my phone charged while traveling.

The biggest con is that its square shape makes it uncomfortable to carry in a front But, it’s at home in a cargo. fanny pack, or day pack. My favorite features of the Flip 12 are it charges quickly and it doesn’t need a charging cable—the USB is built in. I also think it’s a great companion to a solar panel like the BigBlue.

Best for Backpacking: Anker PowerCore Essential 20,000 mAh

Key Features

  • 20,000 mAh
  • Up to five phone charges
  • USB-C and Micro USB input
  • Two USB output ports
  • 11 hours to fully charge the power bank
  • Weight: 12 ounces
  • Length: 6.25 inches
  • Width: 2.875 inches
  • Depth:.5 inch

Product Description

This is a power house for charging devices. Whether you’re on a short trip where you need to charge a bunch of devices or a long trip where you need to just keep a phone juiced, this is the best power bank. It weighs less than a pound and it’s easy to carry thanks to its slim profile and beveled corners.

The biggest con of the 20,000 mAh PowerCore is it takes a long time to fully charge. But, the negatives end there. The two USB ports allow you to simultaneously charge two devices. I used it to charge my phone and headlamp each night during a weekend outing. During a November fishing trip, I left the 20,000 mAh PowerCore outside in freezing temperatures. The power bank didn’t lose a bit of charge, which has been my experience with all my Anker power banks in cold weather. Granted, my cold weather in Virginia is different from Fairbanks, Alaska’s cold weather.

Best for iPhones: Anker Powercore Magnetic 5K

Key Features

  • Wireless charging
  • USC-C output and input
  • 5,000 mAh
  • Charges in three hours
  • Charges a phone once
  • Magnetic charging works with iPhone 12, iPhone 12 mini, iPhone 12 Pro, and iPhone 12 Pro Max
  • Weight: 4.6 ounces
  • Length: 3.625 inches
  • Width: 2.437 inches
  • Depth:.625 inch

Product Description

The PowerCore Magnetic 5K is a great size for everyday carry. It’s super lightweight and charges a phone fast using a USB-C charger. But, don’t buy this charger unless you have an iPhone, preferably a 12 variant, and a compatible magnetic case. If you don’t have a compatible magnetic case, you’ll have to remove your case to use the magnetic feature and you’ll be disappointed in the strength of the magnet.

But, if you do invest in a magnetic case, it’s a great wireless charger for outdoors use. Other wireless chargers aren’t practical for outdoor use because they need to be laid flat to maintain contact with your phone. But, the magnetic power bank from Anker snaps to your phone and stays connected even in a cargo or your best backpack. You get the benefit of not needing to bring a charging cable and a continuous charge while you use your phone. I find this charger is ideal for all day sits, or days when I’m running OnX continuously.

How to Choose a Power Bank

Power banks are a lot like other outdoor gear, there’s a trade off between features and weight. You can get more capability, but you’ll pay for it in size and weight. You’ll have to decide how much capability you need and how much weight you’re willing to carry.

Here are more things you’ll need to consider when buying a power bank or solar charger.

What is a mAh and how much do I need?

A spec you’ll often see is mAh, which stands for milliamps hour. The mAh spec is a measurement of power over time, the higher the mAh the more power the battery contains. To fully charge a phone you’ll need 3,000 to 5,000 mAh.

Watts

A watt is a measurement of rate of energy transfer. So, when shopping for portable solar chargers keep in mind that the more wattage the more power the panel can provide. I’d recommend at least a 24-watt solar charger.

Are solar chargers practical?

If you’re in an area where you can provide a solar charger full sun, and leave it all day to charge a power bank or device, they are practical. But, you can’t expect a solar charger that fits in your to work well because you need surface area to effectively charge.

I found small solar panels to work best for maintaining battery life, rather than being used to fully charge a device. The main issue is that portable solar panels are small, and can only gather so much electricity. What they can do is lengthen your phone or power bank’s life. When you stop to glass or cook lunch, lay out your panel and let it charge the device for a few hours. Even if it’s a few percent increase in battery life, it’s free energy and a few percent here and there can add up over a week’s trip. If you get an extra 25 percent out of our powerbank I count that as a win.

Solar panels are also bulky and heavy. For example, the BigBlue weighs 1.5 pounds, and the 20,000 mAh PowerCore weighs less than a pound. You can pack two 20,000 mAh charges that would charge a phone ten times total and weigh the same as a BigBlue.

Waterproof power banks

Why didn’t I include any waterproof power banks? The rugged power banks that are fully waterproof and shock resistant come at the penalty of being heavy and bulky for the amount of power they provide. I’d much rather drop my power bank in a dry bag than carry the extra weight of a waterproof power bank. It’s also worth pointing out that while your waterproof power bank might survive a submersion, your phone won’t.

FAQs

Q: Which capacity of power bank is best?

A 10,000 mAh power bank is a good balance between charging ability (two phone charges) and size.

Q: Which brand power bank is best?

Anker makes the best power banks for everyday use. Goal Zero makes great power banks specific for the outdoors.

Q: How do I choose a good power bank?

First decide how much capacity you need and the physical size of the charger you’re willing to carry. Then you can look at the available options with your required specifications.

Q: What is the difference between a power bank and a portable charger?

They are synonyms and serve the same functions.

Why Trust Outdoor Life?

Since 1898, OL has been a leading authority in testing and reviewing hunting gear, fishing tackle, guns and shooting equipment, and much more. We have more than a century-long history of evaluating products, and we’re now bringing that expertise to online reviews. Our editors are experienced outdoorsmen and women, and most importantly, we’re trained journalists. We prioritize field testing and objective data when reviewing products. We conduct interviews with gear manufacturers and engineers as well as outdoor experts so that our readers have an understanding of how and why a product works—or doesn’t.

Advertising does not influence our gear reviews and it never will. While we always FOCUS our coverage on standout products—because we want our readers to be aware of the latest and greatest gear—we also cover the flaws and quirks of any given product.

Final Thoughts on the Best Power Bank

The best power bank for you is going to be the one that best fits your specific needs. If you’re a whitetail hunter that just needs something for an all day sit, then the 10,000 mAh PowerCore is going to work well for you. If you spend all your time on a boat and need a power bank to keep your GoPros charged and not slow down if it gets wet, the Anker Solar is perfect. The key is deciding what features best fit how you’ll use your power bank and then choose the charger that best matches your requirements.

  • Best Overall:Anker PowerCore Slim 10,000 mAh
  • Best Solar:BigBlue 28-Watt Solar Charger
  • Best for Fishing:Anker Solar
  • Best Mini:Goal Zero Flip 12
  • Best for Backpacking:Anker PowerCore Essential 20,000 mAh
  • Best for iPhones:Anker Powercore Magnetic 5K

Scott Einsmann is Outdoor Life’s gear editor. He oversees the gear team’s editors and writers who are subject matter experts in bows, knives, hunting, fishing, backpacking, and more. He lives in Richmond, Virginia with his wife and two bird dogs.

Our favourite portable chargers and power banks rated and reviewed, plus an in-depth buyer’s guide

by Matt Jones

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In recent years, the rise of portable battery chargers or power banks has meant that heading into the great outdoors no longer means going off-grid. And being able to keep your devices charged even when you’re miles from the mains has some undeniable benefits. After all, a functioning phone can be a lifesaver in an emergency. We’ve tested ten of the best portable power banks and solar chargers for backpacking in a range of sizes and capacities. So whether you’re after a small, lightweight pal or a rugged, heavy-duty Hero, there should be something for you. This group test also includes three solar-powered chargers. These offer an alternative solution to the perennial power problem for adventurers planning to spend multiple days in the wilderness.

lightest, 20000mah, power, bank

What Makes The Best Portable Power Pack?

Firstly, think about how much power you’re likely to need and how long you might be away from a power source. This will dictate what size power bank you need in terms of battery capacity, which is usually measured in milliamp hours (mAh).

To help you out, note that it typically takes 2,500 to 3,500mAh to charge a modern smartphone (though many factors can affect power consumption). Charging a GPS unit or digital camera is likely to consume a similar amount of power, while charging a head torch, smartwatch or GoPro will consume much less. High-powered devices like tablets and laptops are the biggest drain on battery capacity.

Put simply, the larger the rated capacity (in mAh), the more juice the power bank can store – though the trade-off is increased size and weight. So if you’re only carrying a smartphone on a day walk and just want a back-up power source, look for a.sized battery charger. On the other hand, if you’re planning to spend multiple days in the wilderness carrying a number of different devices (like a GPS, phone, GoPro and digital camera), then you’re going to need one of the bigger power banks around (probably 20,000mAh).

To power multiple devices effectively you’ll also need a power bank that supports simultaneous charging, i.e. one that has at least two or more outlet ports. Many of the latest models also offer features such as quick charging through high-speed USB or USB-C connectivity, as well as in-built technologies to prevent over-charging and optimise charging efficiency.

Durable Power Banks

Also consider your environment. In damp, humid conditions or on expeditions you might need a waterproof and rugged power bank, which can cope with moisture or even complete immersion as well as bumps and knocks. If so, look for a product with a certified IP (International Protection) rating, which is usually expressed as two letters or numerals, e.g. IPX6 or IP67. This standard classifies the degree of protection provided against intrusion, dust, accidental contact and water.

“It typically takes 2,500 to 3,500mAh to charge a modern smartphone”

As well as being impact and water-resistant, power banks specifically designed for the great outdoors often have LED lights, so they can be used as torches. This can be a useful additional feature, as can power banks with integrated charging cables – so you don’t have to remember to bring separate cables with you.

Other devices have integrated or add-on solar panels, which offer the ability to top up the power using energy from the sun. Solar panels are becoming more efficient all the time, meaning that this is now a viable option for those planning to spend days or even weeks off-grid. Most solar panels trickle-charge a power bank over a period of several hours, but others can also be plugged directly into your device.

GP Batteries Charge AnyWay

Price: £29.99 Weight: 224g Capacity: 10,400mAh Dimensions (L x W x D): 81 x 64 x 25 mm

One of the most innovative bits of outdoor kit we’ve seen recently, The Charge AnyWay from GP Batteries is a 2-in-1 battery charger and power bank. It comes with 4 x nifty RecyKo rechargeable AA batteries. These batteries can all be used separately from the power bank. That means that with the power bank and these batteries, you’ve got the versatility to charge your smartphone or battery-powered devices like a headtorch. It’s easy to use too, thanks to a dual color LED indicator that displays charging status. In-built safety protection offers security against overheating, overloading or short circuits.

Pros: Lightweight, versatile, easy to use and eco-friendly, since it uses rechargeable batteries rather than a lithium ion cell, and reduces your reliance on single-use AA batteries. Cons: Not the speediest. It takes about 6 hours to fully charge the supplied 4 x AA RecyKo AA batteries. It’s also not as quick as other portable chargers when used as a power bank due to the 1A USB output.

Biolite Charge 20

Price: £40 Weight: 166g Capacity: 5,200mAh Dimensions (L x W x D): 108 x 44 x 20mm

The smallest power bank on test, the Biolite Charge 20 weighs under 200g and slides easily into a It has a 5,200mAh capacity – enough for about two smartphone charges. It is easy to operate. There’s just a single button that lights up a four-LED indicator telling you how much juice is left. There’s one micro-USB input and one 2.1A USB output, offering fairly swift charging. The stainless steel housing is sleek and durable, while a flip-top lid helps to protect the ports from dirt and moisture. The Charge 20 has an IPX6 rating, offering resistance to rain and spills. It is supplied with its own charging cable.

Pros: Lightweight, compact and durable. Just slip it into a and head out into the hills for peace of mind, knowing you can keep your phone alive throughout the day. Cons: Single outlet port and limited battery capacity means this little guy reaches his limits when it comes to charging bigger devices.

Goalzero Venture 70

Price: £136.95 Weight: 485g Capacity: 17,700mAh Dimensions (L x W x D): 170 x 103 x 29mm

The Goal Zero Venture 70 is a seriously rugged, waterproof power bank with an IP67 rating. It has a fairly generous 17,700mAh capacity – enough to charge a smartphone five times (though the manufacturer quotes up to six charges). The two high-speed 2.4A USB outputs can charge two devices simultaneously.

The Venture 70 also has a Smart charge feature that can identify different devices. It then applies the fastest charging profile possible, without risk of overheating or overcharging. It also allows pass-through charging. That means you can safely charge devices from the power bank even when it’s plugged into the mains. We also liked the built-in 65-lumen LED torch, which has two brightness settings and three strobe modes, including SOS.

Pros: Packed with useful features and some sophisticated internal tech. The extremely rugged, waterproof housing with integrated cables makes the Venture 70 a very practical option for the great outdoors. Cons: It’s the heaviest power bank in this round-up, and also the most expensive. If you really want to get the best out of the product you’ll need to read the instruction manual. That explains how to initiate the Smart charge sequence whenever you plug in a device for the first time.

Zendure A6PB

Price: £80 Weight: 392g Capacity: 20,100mAh Dimensions (L x W x D): 168 x 85 x 28mm

Zendure’s A6PB cutting-edge power bank is equipped with USB-C and 3.0A USB outlet ports for Rapid charging of two devices simultaneously. It has a generous 20,100mAh capacity, enough to fully charge an iPhone X 5½ times. We found that real-world performance matched the manufacturer’s claims. It also offers pass-through charging. Auto-detection means that devices start to charge as soon as they are plugged in. Adaptive charging automatically adjusts the output to charge your device at optimum speed. The A6PD also has in-built protection against short circuits, power surges, overheating and overcharging. It comes with a protective cloth pouch and USB cable.

Pros: With the quickest charge times of any power bank in this round-up, the A6PD is ideal for those with the latest devices who need their juice fast. Cons: Although housed in an extremely rugged composite case, this power bank does not carry an IP rating and is not waterproof.

GP Batteries M-Series MP15MA

Price: £34.99 Weight: 347g Capacity: 15,000mAh Dimensions (L x W x D): 140 x 75 x 24mm

With USB-C and twin 2.4A USB outputs, the GP Batteries M-series power bank supports the latest devices and offers speedy charging. You can charge up to three devices simultaneously. The 15,000mAh capacity gives a real-world performance of about four to five smartphone charges (though the manufacturer quotes six). It’s very simple and easy to use – a single button with four LED indicator lights and device auto-detection means you can just plug in and go. It is supplied with a 2-in-1 micro-USB and USB-C cable.

Pros: Striking a good balance between capacity, weight and size, this is a versatile all-rounder at a competitive price. For us, it’s the best value option in this test. The triple outlet ports are very useful, while USB-C input/output supports the latest devices and permits Rapid mains charging. Cons: Though the case features anti-slip rubber coated edges that may help to absorb minor impacts, the power bank does not carry an IP rating. Nor is it supplied with a protective pouch.

Outdoor Tech Kodiak Plus 2.0

Price: £59.99 Weight: 290g Capacity: 10,000mAh Dimensions (L x W x D): 123 x 88 x 28mm

Thanks to its IPX7 rating, this power bank by Outdoor Tech can be submerged in 3ft of water for up to 30 minutes. That makes it well-suited to the most demanding conditions. It also has a built-in 100-lumen torch with three light settings – another useful feature for the great outdoors. The design is compact and relatively lightweight, while the 10,000mAh capacity gives you real-world performance of a little over three full smartphone charges. However, although there are two USB outlet ports, only one of these supports high-speed charging. The Kodiak Plus 2.0 does not have charge-through capability either.

Pros: Very rugged construction and simple operation. We also like the bright LED flashlight for use around camp. Cons: While the 2.4A USB output is speedy, the slower 1.0A port is sluggish compared to the multiple high-speed charging options of other power banks here.

Anker Powercore 20100

Price: £34.99 Weight: 353g Capacity: 20,100mAh Dimensions (L x W x D): 173 x 67 x 26mm

This slim-line power bank has two 2.4A USB outputs for high-speed charging, augmented by Anker’s PowerIQ Smart charge and voltage boost technology. This identifies your device and adjusts voltage output accordingly, while also compensating for cable resistance. It’s all intended to deliver the fastest possible charging speed, even when charging two devices simultaneously.

Real world performance was very good. The large 20,100mAh capacity gives five to seven smartphone charges, depending on the model. The Powercore 20100 also has built-in protection from power surges and short circuits. It comes with a micro USB cable and a travel pouch.

Pros: Slim design, simple to use and good performance. High battery capacity and competitively priced too. Cons: We wish it had a USB-C port. The only other real drawback is that the plastic case is not IP-rated against impact or moisture, meaning it’s not as tough as some other power banks we tested. Basically, don’t drop it or let it get wet!

Ravpower Xtreme RP-PB41

Price: £36.99 Weight: 459g Capacity: 26,800mAh Dimensions (L x W x D): 178 x 85 x 27mm

This Ravpower Xtreme power bank boasts triple 2.4A USB ports so you can charge three devices simultaneously at high speed. An impressive array of built-in technology protects against overheating, overcharging, short circuits and power surges. It also automatically adjusts charge output and voltage for optimum charging speeds. It’s incredibly simple to use, with a single button that displays a four-LED power indicator to let you know how much juice you have left. Not that you’re likely to run out, given the whopping 26,800mAh battery capacity. That gives you nine full charges for the iPhone X, which is impressive. It is supplied with a micro-USB cable and a travel pouch.

Pros: Huge battery capacity, multiple outlets, high-speed charging, easy to use and very well-priced. Cons: Inevitably, this power bank is fairly heavy. We also wish it had a USB-C port – though the latest 26800mAh Ravpower model (the PB058) has added this feature. Our only other negative is that this power bank isn’t IP-rated, so it isn’t as tough as some.

WakaWaka Power With Solar Panel And Link

Price: Power £49.99, Solar panel and link £79.99 Weight: Power 165g, Solar panel and link 751g Capacity: Power 3,000mAh, Solar panel and link max 10W output Dimensions (L x W x D): Power 125 x 83 x 21mm, Solar panel (folded) 170 x 170 x 28mm

A compact and lightweight power bank with an integrated solar panel that can fully recharge its 3,000mAh internal battery in 12-18 hours of sunlight. The WakaWaka Power has a single 2.1A USB output and a micro-USB input (so you can charge it from the mains too). In addition, the Power has a 70-lumen LED torch with four brightness settings and SOS mode. The 3,000mAh capacity gives you about 200 hours of light or one full smartphone charge, and charging speed is fairly swift. The power bank has a swivelling base that enables you to place it at almost any angle. This is ideal for positioning it as a camp lantern or adjusting the solar panel to ensure it is in direct sunlight.

To boost the capability, you can also add a separate folding solar panel with a max 10W output. It connects to the Power via a link box. This also has a second USB port so you can charge another device simultaneously. Setup is simpler than it sounds, and the Power’s LED indicators tell you how much juice it has left as well as how effectively it is charging from the sun.

Pros: It has a useful LED light and enough juice to give your smartphone a full charge. When coupled with the separate solar panel and link, its capabilities are drastically increased for off-grid trips. The 10W panel has a bigger output than any other solar charger we tested. Cons: The Power is obviously limited by its small 3,000mAh capacity, though WakaWaka also sell 5,000 and 10,000mAh power banks that are compatible with the solar panel and link. However, the key drawbacks of the system are cost and weight. Though it has a big 10W output, the solar panel is heavy, while the total cost of the Power, solar panel and link is nearly £130. And like all solar-powered systems, you’re obviously reliant on several hours of sunshine to get optimum results. The panel itself delivers solid performance though.

Freeloader Sixer Plus Supercharger Solar Panel

Price: Sixer £69.99, Supercharger £49.99 (or buy together as the Off Grid Adventurer bundle for £110) Weight: Sixer 250g, Supercharger 311g Capacity: Sixer 6,000mAh, Supercharger max 5W output Dimensions (L x W x D): Sixer 134 x 83 x 30mm, Supercharger 275 x 180 x 15mm

Another compact and relatively lightweight power bank with an integrated solar panel that can fully recharge its 6,000mAh internal battery in 28 hours of sunlight. However, with the Supercharger solar panel attached, charge time is reduced to around 8 hours, or 6 hours if all the solar panels are in direct sunlight. The Freeloader Sixer has a 2.1A USB output as well as integrated micro-USB and lightning cables, enabling up to three devices to be charged simultaneously.

Pros: Easy to use thanks to the LCD screen’s clear icons that indicate remaining battery life and charging source. We liked the integrated charging cables too. The 5W Supercharger solar panel is impressively thin and light. It also comes with Velcro straps to attach it to a rucksack. The solar cells are efficient enough to charge even in overcast conditions. That makes the system a good option for off-grid adventurers – provided you’ll see some sun. Cons: The integrated support stand used to position the Sixer is flimsy and snapped on test. Though marketed as impact- and water-resistant, it does not carry an IP-rating. It does have a rubberised cover to help protect against damage, but this needs to be removed to use the integrated charging cables.

Powertraveller Extreme Solar – Best In Test

Price: £115 Weight: Extreme 280g, Solar panel 284g Capacity: Extreme 12,000mAh, Solar panel max 5W output Dimensions (L x W x D): Extreme 140 x 78 x 28mm, Solar panel (folded) 275 x 180 x 15mm

This combination battery and solar charger kit consists of two components. There’s a 12,000mAh capacity power bank and a separate folding solar panel of clamshell design that delivers a max output of 5W. The power bank has a 2.0A USB output as well as a USB-C port and, uniquely among the power banks in this test, a 12V DC outlet. This makes the Powertraveller a versatile option for charging multiple devices quickly, from SLR cameras and GPS devices to the latest smartphones. It’s housed in a tough, rugged, waterproof case with an IP65 rating, meaning it is dust-proof and waterproof (though not immersible). The power bank also supports pass-through charging and is supplied with an array of cables to fit various devices.

The solar panel is compact and lightweight. It unfolds to 210 degrees and will charge in low light conditions. A flashing LED light shows green for optimum charging, red for lower-quality conditions. Handily it also comes with a Velcro strap that enables you to attach the panel to a rucksack.

Pros: Very versatile thanks to multiple outlets, including USB-C and a 12V DC output. Decent battery capacity gives up to five full smartphone charges. This is also the toughest solar charger on test, making it our preferred option for multi-day wilderness trips. Cons: Few drawbacks other than the standard proviso that applies to all solar-powered products – you’re obviously reliant on several hours of decent sunshine to get good performance. However, even when used as a standard power bank the Powertraveller performs extremely well.

NITECORE CARBO 20000 Ultra Lightweight Carbon Fibre 20,000mAh Power Bank

Capacity: 20,000mAh 3.85V (77Wh)

Rated Energy: 13,500mAh 5V (TYP 2A)

Output: USB-C: 5V⎓3A / 9V⎓2.22A / 12V⎓1.68A

Dimensions: 124mm x 60mm x 21.8mm (4.88″ x 2.36″ x 0.86″)

Weight: 295.5G±5G (10.42 oz±0.1 oz)

Accessory: USB-C Charging Cable

Aus Post Delivery Estimates
State Express Standard
VIC 1 business day 2 business days
ACT, NSW SA 2 business days 3 business days
QLD TAS 2 business days 4 business days
NT 4 business days 6 business days
WA 3 business days 5 business days

Brand

Nitecore

Nitecore, founded in 2007, is particularly known for their power supplies. Aus Power Banks stocks a variety of Nitecore products, ranging from generators and solar panel kits to small power banks. Our collection of Nitecore products allows you to choose the product that is the most applicable to your needs. Our range will have you equip for all situations; whether you are going on a long camping trip or just looking for a power bank to put in your bag. These products are high quality and made from durable materials, meaning that they will last you many trips and adventures and you will get a lot of use out of them. All Nitecore products come with a full 2 year manufacturer warranty which warrants the product against any manufacturing defects.

review for NITECORE CARBO 20000 Ultra Lightweight Carbon Fibre 20,000mAh Power Bank

Simple, light weight and plenty of power. Writing this review after second night hiking with the carbo. Has charged two phones, two head torches and a mattress inflator/camp light both nights ans still 75% charge on the powerbank. Very happy. Can be hard to work out if the headlamps (also nitecore) are charged because even on low power mode the powerbank turns off before charged status is shown on the headlamp. However the lights do seem to charge fully. Power bank feels great with good solid build.

The best power banks 2022

Choosing a power bank can be a minefield. There are cheap ones, pricey ones, and sometimes you’re paying simply for a name – but there’s a lot more to finding the perfect portable charger than looking at price alone.

Some other things you might consider include speed, both in charging your connected device and recharging the bank when it empties. Capacity is important, too: it needs to be high enough to get your through the day with juice to spare – even share – without weighing down your or bag.

Ports and connections matter, too. What are you charging? A phone, a laptop, a watch? The number and range of ports is important, and if you want to avoid carrying multiple cables then you could look for a version with built-in cables or wireless charging.

While we care about design, it’s actually much lower on our priority list than the things we mention above – unless, of course, we have need for a particularly rugged model or something that supports solar charging because we’re going to be away from mains power for an extended period. That’s not to say we won’t appreciate added extras such as an LCD screen and waterproofing – don’t you want the coolest and most convenient power bank you can get for your money?

These days, it’s even possible to rent power banks as and when you need them (check out ChargedUp). Mind blown. To ensure you get the very best power bank for your needs, whatever that looks like, read on for more detailed buying advice below our chart.

Best power bank reviews

Zendure SuperMini X3 – Best 10000mAh Power Bank

The Zendure SuperMini X3 certainly isn’t the cheapest 10000mAh power bank around, but it makes up for that in specs.

The headline is the 45W USB-C PD charging – for both input and output. That means you can re-charge the power bank itself in just an hour or so, but also that this is fast enough to meet the max charging speeds on most Apple and Samsung phones, and can even keep many laptops running.

lightest, 20000mah, power, bank

The same port also supports the PPS standard at up to 33W speeds.

There are also two USB-A ports, one at 18W and another at 15W, and you can use all three ports simultaneously with 15W speeds from each.

Throw in the small LCD display to report battery life and the light and compact design (in a range of four colours, no less) and it’s easy to see why you might want to spend a little extra for the SuperMini X3.

Charmast 10,400mAh Power Bank – Best Value Power Bank with LCD

There was a time when power banks with LCD displays were rather expensive, but have now come down as the screens filter through to even affordable models like this.

The power bank also has three outputs, which will come in handy if you have multiple devices to charge. There are two full-size USBs, plus a USB-C PD port that can act as both input and output, and all three support 18W Quick Charge – although only one at a time.

On the side is an additional Quick Charge 2.0-compatible Micro-USB, which can also be used for charging the bank. It will charge in about 3.5 hours with a Quick Charge/PD adapter, but about 5.5 hours with a standard 10W charger.

The downside of the design is that it’s a bit bigger than many of the super-slim, similar-capacity models on the market. This Charmast is roughly the same width as a phone, but a little shorter and a fair bit chunkier. It weighs in at 228g, which you may decide is better suited to a bag than your

Charmast supplies a soft mesh carry case and a short USB-A to USB-C cable in the box, a nice touch.

Zendure SuperMini Go

  • Interesting camera-inspired design
  • Supports 15W wireless charging
  • Strong device support
  • Available only via IndieGoGo (for now)
  • LCD is a little dim and can be difficult to read

The Zendure SuperMini Go is something a little different: a power bank that tries very hard not to look like one.

Zendure’s design is inspired by classic cameras, which is if nothing else a fun way to incorporate the large ring required for wireless charging – which here sits right where a camera lens would be. Instead of a viewfinder, there’s a rear LCD display to show battery percentage – though be warned that this is quite dim and hard to read.

It’s available in silver and black finishes, along with our more out there ‘Sunset Cyan’ gradient.

The SuperMini Go isn’t all about looks though, and it has some solid specs to match. The total capacity is 10,000mAh, and in addition to 15W wireless charging (with a magnet to keep phones steady) there’s 20W USB-C charging and 22.5W USB-A charging.

Compatibility is impressive too – not only will this work with both iOS and Android devices, but the ‘X-Charge’ mode is capable of topping up lower power devices like wearables and headphones, which not all power banks support.

The SuperMini Go is available now for backers on IndieGoGo with discounted launch pricing from 44 (down from an official price of 69), but with Zendure’s track record it’s very likely this will be in stores including Amazon before long.

JIGA 30,000mAh Power Bank – Most Versatile Power Bank

JIGA is a new name to us in terms of power bank tech, but its 30,000mAh power bank is interesting for a number of reasons – and not least the huge capacity, which will be some comfort on trips away from mains power.

While it’s something of a throwback to power banks from a couple of years back, with its built-in LED flash (certainly useful for camping trips) and durable but plasticky design, it also takes us back to the days where you didn’t have to sacrifice ports for portability.

It’s surprisingly small for such a high-capacity bank, but it’s more bag- rather than.friendly.

The JIGA has USB-C, Micro-USB and Lightning inputs, allowing you to fill its battery using whatever cable you have to hand. It’s a shame that the USB-C port doesn’t also work as an output, but there are three full-size USB-A outputs, each rated at 10.5W.

This isn’t the Power Delivery speeds we’re becoming increasingly familiar with today, but it’s plenty fast for charging a phone (or multiple phones).

If all you need is a healthy stream of power to keep topped up a number of mobile devices, this JIGA power bank will be a very handy device to have around.

Anker PowerCore Essential 20,000 PD – Best 20,000mAh Power Bank

Hailing from Anker, a respected brand in the power bank market, this 20,000mAh portable charger represents very good value at this capacity.

The 345.5G Essential is a black plastic brick, though relatively compact for the amount of power it can hold. It has a textured top surface that improves grip in the hand, as well as the overall appearance.

We’re pleased to find support for Power Delivery, but do note that it’s only up to 18W, and therefore not likely to be sufficient to charge a USB-C laptop. Still, for quick-charging a phone or tablet, this is a useful device.

A full-size USB output that uses Anker’s PowerIQ smarter charging algorithm is joined by a USB-C port that is both input and output. On top is a power button with four integrated LEDs that reveal remaining capacity, and you can use this to enter a trickle-charging mode suitable for smartwatches and earbuds.

A USB-C to USB-C cable and soft mesh carry case are provided in the box, which is a nice touch.

Anker PowerCore III 10K Wireless – Best Wireless Power Bank

The Anker PowerCore III 10K Wireless is a Qi wireless charger with a special feature: you can use it as a portable power bank, too, which can be super handy.

You can use it at home or work plugged in, and carry it around with you for wired or wireless charging when you are away from a power socket. Because it’s wireless, there’s no need to carry a cable around with you.

As the name suggests, the PowerCore III 10K has a decent sized 10,000mAh battery, which should offer at least three charges from the power bank before it needs recharging itself.

The wireless charger is rated at 10W. Place your device on the centre of the circle. We didn’t find the placement too sensitive, as some wireless chargers can be. It’s not auto-start, though – as a power bank it requires you to push the button first.

You can also charge from the two USB-A ports at one end – at a total of 18W, so charging two or three (one wireless, two wired) devices will split that power output.

Anker PowerCore Magnetic 5K – Best MagSafe Power Bank

This portable wireless charger is one of the best accessories you can get for your iPhone.

In essence, it’s a 5,000mAh palm-sized power bank that will charge your compatible iPhone simply by snapping it onto the back with MagSafe.

It works through some cases, charges over USB-C, comes in a range of colours and, even if you don’t have MagSafe, can be used to charge almost anything via cable.

A handy set of LEDs indicates how much charge the PowerCore has remaining.

Moshi IonGo 5K Duo – Best Design

It’s expensive, but you’ll pay out for the IonGo 5K Duo from Moshi if style is as important to you as is functionality.

Almost identical in design to the IonGo 5K before it, but here with both USB-C and Lightning cables built-in (hence the name Duo), the Moshi is an undeniably cool-looking power bank that comes tucked away inside a vegan-friendly soft leather case with a magnetic clasp and an anodised aluminium faceplate.

The additional cable means it’s now suited to Android as well as iPhone users, although as before this is Made For iPhone-certified.

This is a truly premium device with a colossal 10-year warranty going a long way to account for its higher asking price. It’s also possibly the dinkiest 5,000mAh power bank we’ve seen, suggesting there are some serious high-tech components inside.

At this capacity, expect a full charge for any Android phone, and potentially two for iPhone. Moshi claims the bank will also retain that power for up to 27 months when left unused.

Charging is up to 15W over USB-C and 12W over Lightning. Use Lightning and USB-C together and you’ll see slightly slower charging speeds, with a max total output of 3.4A (17W).

You can also use the USB-C cable for recharging the bank, again up to 15W. Better still, the Moshi supports passthrough charging, allowing you to charge both it and a connected device at once, but given that there’s no separate input here that’s going to work only with iPhone.

The Duo is currently out of stock at Amazon, but you can still pick up the iPhone model.

Chargeasap Flash Pro / Flash Pro Plus – Fastest Charging Power Bank

  • Unbeatable recharging speed
  • High-capacity (25,000mAh)
  • Range of outputs
  • 5-year lifespan
  • Expensive
  • Bulky and heavy
  • Attracts fingerprints
  • No charger or cable supplied

These graphene-composite power banks are able to charge cooler than ordinary lithium-polymer batteries, and thus can do significantly faster: you’ll get to 80% of these 25,000mAh batteries in just 45 minutes.

In addition to this there is a healthy smattering of ports, with three USB-Cs running at 100W, 60W and 20W, a 50W USB-A that supports Quick Charge 3.0 and SVOOC, plus wireless charging. You get a 15W MagSafe pad and a 5W Apple Watch charger in the Flash Pro Plus, and a 15W Qi charger in the Flash Pro.

Down sides include an expensive price tag, and a bulky, heavy design, but for sheer performance and functionality the Chargeasap banks are among the most capable we’ve ever tested.

FAQ

What capacity power bank do I need?

Don’t fall into the trap of thinking a 3,000mAh power bank will give your 3,000mAh battery smartphone a full charge, and that a 9,000mAh power bank will charge it three times. No portable charger runs at 100% efficiency. In truth, most average between 60- and 70%, with the best-performing models able to reach 80- or 90%. Wireless charging models may be less efficient still.

To work out what capacity bank you need, first check the spec of the device you want to charge to find out its battery capacity, then decide how many times you want to be able to charge it. For a rough estimate, calculate Connected device battery capacity x Number of recharges x 1.6 = Minimum power bank capacity you should look to buy.

As a rule of thumb, a 5,000mAh bank is a single-charge device, 10,000mAh hits the sweet spot between capacity and portability, and you want to look for closer to 20,000mAh for a laptop. We’ve got some of those high-capacity power banks here – just don’t try to stuff any of them in your !

How long does it take to recharge a power bank?

The time required to recharge a power bank will depend on its capacity, what you are using to recharge its battery and whether or not it’s empty.

For the fastest charging you should look to the new breed of power banks that support graphene technology and charge over a DC input (such as the Chargeasap Flash Pro – a 25,000mAh bank that can get to 80% in 45 mins and 100% in 70 mins), but these tend to be pricey.

For mainstream power banks, the fastest you’ll find is a USB-C inout/output that supports Power Delivery. This standard now goes up to a maximum of 240W, but in portable chargers you should expect to find an 18W port. Using such a port, the average 10,000mAh power bank might recharge in 2-3 hours from empty.

The cheapest models still tend to charge over Micro-USB, usually at around 10-12W. Avoid 5W power banks like the plague unless they are very low in capacity or you’re not in a rush.

What is passthrough charging?

Passthrough charging allows you to simultaneously charge devices connected to a power bank and the power bank itself. It’s a very handy solution if you are short on mains power outlets and need to get multiple devices charged up overnight, for example. However, not all power banks support it, so be sure to check the spec of your portable charger before you buy.

How do I know how much power is left in my power bank?

Assuming you know how much capacity it had when full, you can work out how much power remains either through a series of LEDs on the casing (usually activated by plugging in a device to charge or pressing a button on the side), or via the LCD if your power bank supports one. LCDs are preferrable, because they give a more accurate readout, particularly when it comes to higher-capacity power banks.

What are GaN power banks?

GaN is short for gallium nitride. It requires fewer components than traditional silicone chargers, which means power banks that use the technology can be less bulky and more efficient. If portability is your primary concern, then as well as considering the power bank’s capacity you should also look for one that uses GaN.

What charging speed should I look for in a power bank?

The first power banks on to the market ran at 5W, which is the same speed as the original iPhone chargers (aka slllllloooooowwwww). We wouldn’t recommend anything below 10W these days. This speed is known as ‘fast charging’, and it’s still rather common in cheaper models, but it’s not really the fast charging we’ve become accustomed to today. So many of the latest smartphones now support super-fast wired charging, and it seems crazy not to buy a portable charger that supports that top speed if possible.

The standard your phone uses to achieve its top charging speeds is important here. Some have proprietary technologies that work only with accessories manufactured and sold by that company. Some offer fast charging through Quick Charge or Power Delivery. Some support neither Quick Charge nor Power Delivery, but do support protocols such as PPS (Programmable Power Supply) or SCP (Super Charge Protocol). Make sure the portable charger you buy matches the fast charging standard supported by your phone.

The term Power Delivery does not in itself denote a performance rating. It could be capable of delivering anything between 18W and 240W. This is particularly important if you’re looking to charge a USB-C laptop – anything under 30W won’t cut it, many laptops will refuse to play ball below 45W or even 60W, and some larger laptops might require 90W. You will need to check the spec of your laptop to know what speed it requires.

At the other end of the scale, if you need to charge a low-power device such as a smartwatch or a pair of wireless earbuds, look out for a power bank that is certified for low-power devices. Many of those that are not will simply cut out when you try to charge these devices, because they aren’t able to detect a significant drain on the battery.

Power bank manufacturers rarely provide the speed of their outputs in watts. Instead you’ll see a rating in amps, which you multiply by the voltage rating (usually five) to get the rating in watts. So 2A x 5V = 10W.

What is Power Delivery?

USB-C and USB PD are often confused, but the important thing to remember is that USB-C is a reversible connection type, while USB PD is a power delivery specification, overseen by the USB Implementers Forum (USB-IF) and often expressed simply as ‘PD’. With version 3.1 of the specification, Power Delivery is able to carry up to 240W of power plus data over USB-C (previously limited to 100W), but devices that support Power Delivery can range from 18W right up to 240W.

What is Quick Charge?

Quick Charge is a Qualcomm fast-charging protocol that runs on the Snapdragon processors we see inside many smartphones, hence it has become commonplace in the mobile market.

The latest version is Quick Charge 5, which operates at up to 100W and supports USB PD PPS. However, while they are often seen together, Quick Charge and Power Delivery are not the same thing.

Quick Charge 5 is a massive jump up from Quick Charge 4/4, more efficient and able to run cooler and safer, and Qualcomm says it can get a device to 50% in just 5 mins. It is backwards-compatible with earlier versions of the protocol, including 18W Quick Charge 2/3, which are still very common in power banks.

Which outputs should I look for in a power bank?

The type and number of outputs you will need on a power bank depends entirely on what device or devices you want to charge. Pretty much all power banks have a full-size USB output that you can use to plug in your own cable, but it’s not always going to be the fastest way to deliver a charge to your device. You’ll also find USB-C and Lightning outputs, magnetic wireless charging pads and AC outlets if you shop around. Some power banks even have built-in cables to stop you needing to carry around your own, though you will still need one handy to recharge the power bank itself.

Why is the maximum output of a power bank important?

Some power banks have multiple outputs for charging your connected devices, but few power banks are able to simultaneously support all of them at the top advertised speed. Watch out for those that have a lower maximum output than the sum of all ports together. Also be wary of those that have multiple outputs but a very low capacity – these aren’t really designed for plugging in multiple devices, only to be versatile.

What happens when my power bank is more powerful than my connected device?

There is no need to worry about plugging devices into ports that are capable of delivering more power than the device is able to accept, since USB devices will draw only the power they need. Many power banks include technology that is able to intelligently dole out this power among ports more appropriately, depending on what devices you are attempting to charge (often known as Power IQ or similar).

lightest, 20000mah, power, bank

Can I take a power bank on a plane?

Yes, but it must be in your hand luggage, and if it is higher in capacity than 27,000mAh (100Wh) you will need to check with the airline before flying. Make sure you take it out your bag as you pass through security. If a power bank is damaged then it will not be allowed on the plane as it could become a safety hazard. You should also ensure the specifications are clearly printed on the side of its case, as is the norm.

We’ve put together a range of articles to help you choose the best charging tech for the mobile devices you carry everywhere. You’ll also like:

  • For charging away from home:Power banks for laptops | Travel adaptors
  • Best Wall Desktop Chargers:For phones tablets | For laptops
  • For convenience:Best wireless chargers
  • Best charging cables:Micro-USB | USB-C | Lightning

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