Home car charging point. Home car charging point

There’s no one size fits all answer. We’ll help you figure out what’s right for you.

There are a lot of factors to consider when shopping for home EV charging equipment for your electric vehicle. You certainly want to make sure you’re buying a unit from a reputable company, that the unit is safety certified, has a good warranty, and is built to last many years.

However, one of the most important considerations is: How powerful of a charging station do you need? Most battery-electric vehicles (BEVs) available today can accept between 40 to 48-amps while charging from a level 2, 240-volt source. However, there are charging stations available today that can deliver more power, and some that can deliver far less, so deciding how many amps you need for your EV charger might seem a little confusing.

There are four main questions you should consider before purchasing your home EV charging equipment.

How much power can your EV accept?

Electric vehicles are limited to accepting a certain amount of electricity which will be listed in either amperage (amps) or kilowatt (kW). All EVs have onboard chargers, which convert the electricity they receive in the form of alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) which is how it is stored in the vehicle’s battery.

The power of the onboard charger dictates how much AC power the vehicle can accept. Some EVs have more powerful onboard chargers than others, and they range in power from 16-amps (3.7 kW) up to 80-amps (19.2kW). Therefore, the first thing you need to consider is how much power can your EV accept.

How many miles do you usually drive?

Most Americans drive about 40 miles per day. With home EV charging, you only need to replenish the miles you drove that day because you can plug in every night when you arrive home. Therefore, it’s a good idea to know what your daily and weekly driving needs are, because you can probably get by just fine with a home charger that delivers much less power than your EV is capable of accepting.

If you do use a lower-powered home charger and occasionally need more range for a long trip, you can access public DC fast chargers to rapidly charge up for the long drive.

How much power is available at your home?

Your home has a limited supply of electricity, and you may not have enough available power to install a high-powered dedicated circuit for the EV charger without an expensive service upgrade.

You should always have an electrician perform a load calculation of your service before purchasing your EV, so you know if you can install a home charger, and if so, what is the maximum amperage it can deliver.

What is your EV charger budget?

Besides the cost of any possible electric service upgrades, you may need to install the dedicated EV charging circuit, you also need to consider the cost of the charger. Electric vehicle charging equipment can cost as little as 200, and it can also cost up to 2,000, depending on how powerful the unit is and what features it offers.

You should decide what you can and are willing to pay for the charger and installation before searching for a charger. Talk to your electrician about the difference in cost to install the charger based on how many amps it will deliver.

Lower-powered chargers should cost less to install because the thinner wire as well as the less-powerful circuit breaker will cost less than what is required for higher-powered chargers.

EV charging circuits and miles added

Eye on the future

While you may be just getting your first electric vehicle, it surely won’t be your last. The entire industry is in the early years of transitioning to EVs while internal combustion is being phased out. Therefore, it makes sense to consider down the road when you may have two EVs in the garage.

If you have the budget to install a high-powered circuit for charging now, it’s probably the right decision, even if your current EV cannot accept all the power the circuit can deliver. In a few years, you may need to charge two EVs at once, and the single high-powered circuit can power two EV chargers, and ultimately save you the expense of installing a second, lower-powered circuit.

So check out the video and let us know if you have any questions about your home EV charging needs. Leave your Комментарии и мнения владельцев and questions in the comment section below and we’ll try to answer them.

In This Section

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Charger Types and Speeds

EVs can be charged using electric vehicle service equipment (EVSE) operating at different charging speeds.

Level 1

Level 1 equipment provides charging through a common residential 120-volt (120V) AC outlet. Level 1 chargers can take 40-50 hours to charge a BEV to 80 percent from empty and 5-6 hours for a PHEV.

Level 2

Level 2 equipment offers higher-rate AC charging through 240V (in residential applications) or 208V (in commercial applications) electrical service, and is common for home, workplace, and public charging. Level 2 chargers can charge a BEV to 80 percent from empty in 4-10 hours and a PHEV in 1-2 hours.

Direct Current Fast Charging (DCFC)

Direct current fast charging (DCFC) equipment offers Rapid charging along heavy-traffic corridors at installed stations. DCFC equipment can charge a BEV to 80 percent in just 20 minutes to 1 hour. Most PHEVs currently on the market do not work with fast chargers.

Level 2 and DCFC equipment has been deployed at various public locations including, for example, at grocery stores, theaters, or coffee shops. When selecting a charger type, consider its voltages, resulting charging and vehicle dwell times, and estimated up-front and ongoing costs.

The figure below shows typical Level 2 and DCFC charging stations 1.

EV Charging Minimum Standards Rule

FHWA, with support from the Joint Office of Energy Transportation, unveiled new national standards for federally funded EV chargers in February 2023. These new standards aim to ensure that charging is a predictable and reliable experience for EV drivers. This includes ensuring that drivers can easily find a charger, do not need multiple apps and/or accounts to charge, chargers work when drivers need them to, and are designed to be compatible in the future with forward-looking charging capabilities.

The rule establishes minimum technical standards for charging stations, including required number of charging ports, connector types, power level, availability, payment methods, uptime/reliability, EV charger infrastructure network connectivity, and interoperability, among other standards and requirements.

Overview of EV Chargers

The below table summarizes the typical power output, charging time, and locations for PHEVs and BEVs for the different charger types. For more information on the power requirements of different chargers, see the Utility Planning section of the toolkit.

1 Note that charging speed is affected by many factors, including the charger manufacturer, condition, and age; air temperature; vehicle battery capacity; and vehicle age and condition.

2 Different vehicles have different charge ports. For DCFC, the Combined Charging System (CCS) connector is based on an open international standard and is common on vehicles manufactured in North America and Europe; the CHArge de Move (CHAdeMO) connector is most common for Japanese manufactured vehicles. Tesla vehicles have a unique connector that works for all charging speeds, including at Tesla’s “Supercharger” DCFC stations, while non-Tesla vehicles require adapters at these stations.

3 AC = alternating current; DC = direct current.

4 Assuming an 8-kWh battery; most plug-in hybrids do not work with fast chargers.

6 To 80 percent charge. Charging speed slows as the battery gets closer to full to prevent damage to the battery. Therefore, it is more cost- and time-efficient for EV drivers to use direct current (DC) fast charging until the battery reaches 80 percent, and then continue on their trip. It can take about as long to charge the last 10 percent of an EV battery as the first 90 percent.

How To Charge Electric Cars Without A Driveway

Charging at home is perhaps the ideal way to charge. You can charge safely and securely overnight and wake up to a full battery. Home chargers generally charge fairly slowly, which is the best speed to charge if you want to prolong your battery life. Grants can help you afford a charging point at your home, but you can only apply for a grant if you have a place to park where a charging point can be installed.

For people without a driveway, this means they simply can’t have a home charging station and thus cannot enjoy any of these benefits, and it will be more inconvenient to charge. But does that mean drivers without a driveway shouldn’t buy an electric car?

Do You Need A Driveway To Get A Home Charging Point?

Sadly, yes. If you want a home charging point, you need to have a location where it can be installed, so if you have to park on the street outside your home, you cannot have one installed.

Can You Run An Electric Car Charging Cable Across The Pavement?

You can buy very long charging cables and a domestic adapter that enables you to charge your car from your home’s power sockets. However, this is a very slow way to charge, and it will take hours to give you just 10% more battery life. But running a cable from your house over the pavement and into your car is theoretically possible.

While some councils might allow you to do this, charging your car this way is generally not recommended. Firstly, you might not be able to stretch a cable that far, so you might need to use an extension lead, which can be dangerous to charge your car with.

Laying a cable across the pavement is a serious hazard for pedestrians. No matter how careful you’re being, other stuff on the pavement can present hazards for passers-by, bins, recycling boxes, bikes and other parked cars, all adding to the potential hazard. If someone trips over the wire, it could have serious legal implications.

It might feel tempting to try and charge with a charging cable stretched to reach your car parked outside your home, but it’s probably best not to. It’s unsafe and charges so slowly that you’re better off charging elsewhere.

Can You Charge Electric Cars At Home If You Live In A Flat?

If you live in a flat, you can’t have a home charging point unless you have a designated parking space. This makes owning an EV hard, as even charging from your home with a domestic adapter is impossible. However, this doesn’t mean that there won’t be chargers nearby.

The EV infrastructure grant allows landlords to claim up to £500 per charging bay for up to 60 bays for their tenants. So if you live in a flat and own an EV, it might be worth chatting with your landlord about potentially adding charging points to residential parking spots.

Where Can You Charge Your EV Without A Driveway?

If you don’t own a home charging point or are unwilling to charge with a cable from a domestic adapter, does that mean you can’t own an EV? Of course not; home charging is the most convenient way to charge your EV, but it isn’t the only charging method.

Many other options are available, some of which provide much faster speeds than a home charging station.

Public Charging Networks

Public charging stations are very simple to charge at; you simply drive to one and plug your charger in. The fastest chargers can substantially charge your car in minutes, although most will take longer. There are many different chargers all over the country, operated by many different networks.

Networks generally cover regional areas or destinations, meaning some networks provide chargers exclusively for a local area. In contrast, others provide chargers at destinations like supermarkets or service stations.

Public charging stations are usually located where there are things for you to do, like outside gyms, cinemas or restaurants, allowing you to do other things while your car is charging.

vary at public charging stations but are generally more expensive than at home. Many networks offer subscription models that offer you deals and discounts to help you save money. If there is a network with a conveniently located charger you regularly use, it may be worth paying for a subscription. If you use multiple charging networks and don’t want to pay for a subscription for each one, you should use Bonnet, which lets you connect to 17 charging networks at a discount.

On-Street Public Charging Points

If you’re looking for a substitute for a home charging point, you might be more interested in on-street networks that provide chargers alongside roads with the permission of local councils. These chargers are often retrofitted into bollards or lampposts and offer a convenient way to charge for people without a home charging point.

Generally, these chargers are pretty slow, so they are best used overnight. There are many different on-street networks in the UK, including:

However, like with most public charging, these are more expensive than home charging points, so if you plan to use them regularly, you should look into a subscription.

Use Bonnet To Find The Nearest Public Charging Point

The best way to access on-street or any public charging is with Bonnet. Bonnet is our app that allows drivers to connect to 17 charging networks across the UK, including on-street networks like Source London, Connected Kerb and char.gy.

Bonnet offers membership options that save you up to 15% off all your EV charging at all our partners’ charging points. There are two membership options for drivers, although they can also use the app to connect to all 17 stations without a membership.

Our first option is called Light Boost. Light Boost is just £2 monthly for 10% off all your charging at our partners’ stations. That’s just £24 annually for potentially hundreds of pounds of savings.

Our second option is named Turbo Boost. Turbo Boost is just £8 monthly for 15% off your charging. Turbo Boost is the ideal option for people without home charging points or a driveway where they can charge, as it allows them to save money on all their favourite networks.

Are There Any Free Public Charging Networks?

Yes. Some public charging networks won’t cost you anything to charge at. However, there aren’t too many remaining; for example, Tesco used to provide free slow charging in its car parks but no longer does. Many free charging points are in Scotland’s ChargePlace Scotland network, although not all of their chargers are free.

Tesla Destination has many free charging points across the country, although to use them, you must be a paying customer at the location where they are installed.

How Long Will It Take To Charge At A Public Charging Station?

Charging time depends on which charging speed you use. There are four main charging speeds: slow (up to 3.6 kWh), fast (7. 22 kWh), Rapid (50 kWh) and ultra-Rapid (50 kWh).

Generally, most chargers you’ll find in the UK are slow or fast chargers. Fast chargers will take a few hours to charge your car, while slow chargers will take up to a day to fill it up. Rarer Rapid or ultra-Rapid chargers could fill up your vehicle quickly in under an hour.

Networks offer a variety of charging speeds, although there are some networks that only offer specific speeds. Use Bonnet to check a charger’s speed before using it.

Can You Leave Your Car At A Public Charger Overnight?

Technically, yes. However, it depends on the network. Rapid networks won’t want you to use their chargers overnight as your EV will be charged quickly, so the car will be dormant and stop other drivers from charging, but slower on-street networks will probably have no issue with charging overnight. However, it is best to check beforehand.

Charging At A Friend’s Charging Point

If you know an EV driver who has a home charging point, they might let you charge at their home. Charging at a friend’s house isn’t as convenient as charging at home, but it is still a good alternative to it. If you have no friends or family with a charger, you can always ask EV-driving neighbours if you can occasionally use their charging point.

Charging At Your Work

and more employers are installing charging points in their parking spaces to help reduce their carbon impact and offer their employees easy charging. Workplace charging is a sensible and great way to charge if you have the option. Not all workplaces will have charging points; you might want to chat with your boss if yours doesn’t.

Businesses can apply for grants for charging spaces like landlords can, so installing one might be worth their time. Generally, work chargers are slow and use the universal socket, so you’ll need to bring your own cable to use one.

Charging Vans

Charging vans aren’t an option for most people as there aren’t many services in the country. However, some, like Charge Fairy in London, enable you to charge your car from outside your home. To charge your EV, they fit a charger into their van and simply connect your vehicle to their power source.

Their speeds are slow and relatively expensive, and this service isn’t offered everywhere, but it is a very convenient way of charging your car and a good alternative to home charging.

The On-Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme (ORCS)

If none of the options outlined above is to your liking, you might be interested in contacting your local council and asking them to install a local charging point. ORCS is a government scheme organised by your local council that sets up charging points in areas to allow people to charge who can’t afford or don’t have a home charging point.

home, charging, point

There might be one in your area already, but if there isn’t, it might be worth your time to ask your local council about one. ORCS charging points are generally installed in discrete locations like lamp posts. To use them, you must bring your own cable.

Should You Buy An EV If You Don’t Own A Driveway?

As this article outlines, you have many charging options if you don’t own a driveway. Public chargers are spread out across the country, so there is surely one near you; with discounts from Bonnet, public charging can be very affordable.

In 2030, there will be a ban on all new conventional petrol and diesel vehicles. In preparation for this date, the UK has become increasingly EV-friendly, and more charging infrastructure has been added to support the increased number of drivers.

So even if there isn’t a charging option near you right now, there will certainly be one soon. Electric cars are still cost-effective to charge and are great to use, so if you’re on the fence, why not become an early adopter?

Find The Best Public Charging Points With Bonnet

Bonnet is the ideal way to find the best chargers near you and access them at a discount. A diverse range of charging networks work with our app, ensuring all our customers can always find a charger that suits their requirements.

Each charging network generally requires you to download an app before they let you charge at their points. If you charge at many networks, this can build up, and you’ll soon clutter your phone with countless apps just to access a handful of networks. Bonnet lets you connect to 17 charging networks with just one app.

If you’re interested in finding the best chargers for you, whether you have a home charging point or not, you should download Bonnet today.

FAQs

Can I have an electric car without a driveway?

Yes, you can own an electric car if you don’t have a driveway. You won’t be able to install a home charging point if you don’t have a designated parking spot, but you can still charge your car at work, with on-street chargers and at public charging stations.

How will people without driveways charge electric cars?

There are many ways for people to charge their cars, even if they don’t own a driveway. Your workplace might have chargers you can use, your friends might have a charger they’ll let you use, or a public charging station nearby might suit your needs.

Can I run my electric charging cable across the pavement?

No legal restrictions stop you from running a charging cable across the pavement. However, the Highway Act allows councils to remove the cables, although councils may or may not do so. Running a cable across the pavement presents a hazard to pedestrians that could have legal implications.

Plan, plug pay for every EV journey with Bonnet

24/7 live updates from every charger to ensure top class reliability every time you charge. Join 130,000 EV Drivers.

Charging at home is perhaps the ideal way to charge. You can charge safely and securely overnight and wake up to a full battery. Home chargers generally charge fairly slowly, which is the best speed to charge if you want to prolong your battery life. Grants can help you afford a charging point at your home, but you can only apply for a grant if you have a place to park where a charging point can be installed.

For people without a driveway, this means they simply can’t have a home charging station and thus cannot enjoy any of these benefits, and it will be more inconvenient to charge. But does that mean drivers without a driveway shouldn’t buy an electric car?

Do You Need A Driveway To Get A Home Charging Point?

Sadly, yes. If you want a home charging point, you need to have a location where it can be installed, so if you have to park on the street outside your home, you cannot have one installed.

Can You Run An Electric Car Charging Cable Across The Pavement?

You can buy very long charging cables and a domestic adapter that enables you to charge your car from your home’s power sockets. However, this is a very slow way to charge, and it will take hours to give you just 10% more battery life. But running a cable from your house over the pavement and into your car is theoretically possible.

While some councils might allow you to do this, charging your car this way is generally not recommended. Firstly, you might not be able to stretch a cable that far, so you might need to use an extension lead, which can be dangerous to charge your car with.

Laying a cable across the pavement is a serious hazard for pedestrians. No matter how careful you’re being, other stuff on the pavement can present hazards for passers-by, bins, recycling boxes, bikes and other parked cars, all adding to the potential hazard. If someone trips over the wire, it could have serious legal implications.

It might feel tempting to try and charge with a charging cable stretched to reach your car parked outside your home, but it’s probably best not to. It’s unsafe and charges so slowly that you’re better off charging elsewhere.

Can You Charge Electric Cars At Home If You Live In A Flat?

If you live in a flat, you can’t have a home charging point unless you have a designated parking space. This makes owning an EV hard, as even charging from your home with a domestic adapter is impossible. However, this doesn’t mean that there won’t be chargers nearby.

The EV infrastructure grant allows landlords to claim up to £500 per charging bay for up to 60 bays for their tenants. So if you live in a flat and own an EV, it might be worth chatting with your landlord about potentially adding charging points to residential parking spots.

Where Can You Charge Your EV Without A Driveway?

If you don’t own a home charging point or are unwilling to charge with a cable from a domestic adapter, does that mean you can’t own an EV? Of course not; home charging is the most convenient way to charge your EV, but it isn’t the only charging method.

Public Charging Networks

Public charging stations are very simple to charge at; you simply drive to one and plug your charger in. The fastest chargers can substantially charge your car in minutes, although most will take longer. There are many different chargers all over the country, operated by many different networks.

Networks generally cover regional areas or destinations, meaning some networks provide chargers exclusively for a local area. In contrast, others provide chargers at destinations like supermarkets or service stations.

Public charging stations are usually located where there are things for you to do, like outside gyms, cinemas or restaurants, allowing you to do other things while your car is charging.

vary at public charging stations but are generally more expensive than at home. Many networks offer subscription models that offer you deals and discounts to help you save money. If there is a network with a conveniently located charger you regularly use, it may be worth paying for a subscription. If you use multiple charging networks and don’t want to pay for a subscription for each one, you should use Bonnet, which lets you connect to 17 charging networks at a discount.

On-Street Public Charging Points

If you’re looking for a substitute for a home charging point, you might be more interested in on-street networks that provide chargers alongside roads with the permission of local councils. These chargers are often retrofitted into bollards or lampposts and offer a convenient way to charge for people without a home charging point.

Generally, these chargers are pretty slow, so they are best used overnight. There are many different on-street networks in the UK, including:

However, like with most public charging, these are more expensive than home charging points, so if you plan to use them regularly, you should look into a subscription.

Use Bonnet To Find The Nearest Public Charging Point

The best way to access on-street or any public charging is with Bonnet. Bonnet is our app that allows drivers to connect to 17 charging networks across the UK, including on-street networks like Source London, Connected Kerb and char.gy.

Bonnet offers membership options that save you up to 15% off all your EV charging at all our partners’ charging points. There are two membership options for drivers, although they can also use the app to connect to all 17 stations without a membership.

Our first option is called Light Boost. Light Boost is just £2 monthly for 10% off all your charging at our partners’ stations. That’s just £24 annually for potentially hundreds of pounds of savings.

Our second option is named Turbo Boost. Turbo Boost is just £8 monthly for 15% off your charging. Turbo Boost is the ideal option for people without home charging points or a driveway where they can charge, as it allows them to save money on all their favourite networks.

Are There Any Free Public Charging Networks?

Yes. Some public charging networks won’t cost you anything to charge at. However, there aren’t too many remaining; for example, Tesco used to provide free slow charging in its car parks but no longer does. Many free charging points are in Scotland’s ChargePlace Scotland network, although not all of their chargers are free.

Tesla Destination has many free charging points across the country, although to use them, you must be a paying customer at the location where they are installed.

How Long Will It Take To Charge At A Public Charging Station?

Charging time depends on which charging speed you use. There are four main charging speeds: slow (up to 3.6 kWh), fast (7. 22 kWh), Rapid (50 kWh) and ultra-Rapid (50 kWh).

Generally, most chargers you’ll find in the UK are slow or fast chargers. Fast chargers will take a few hours to charge your car, while slow chargers will take up to a day to fill it up. Rarer Rapid or ultra-Rapid chargers could fill up your vehicle quickly in under an hour.

Networks offer a variety of charging speeds, although there are some networks that only offer specific speeds. Use Bonnet to check a charger’s speed before using it.

Can You Leave Your Car At A Public Charger Overnight?

Technically, yes. However, it depends on the network. Rapid networks won’t want you to use their chargers overnight as your EV will be charged quickly, so the car will be dormant and stop other drivers from charging, but slower on-street networks will probably have no issue with charging overnight. However, it is best to check beforehand.

Charging At A Friend’s Charging Point

If you know an EV driver who has a home charging point, they might let you charge at their home. Charging at a friend’s house isn’t as convenient as charging at home, but it is still a good alternative to it. If you have no friends or family with a charger, you can always ask EV-driving neighbours if you can occasionally use their charging point.

Charging At Your Work

and more employers are installing charging points in their parking spaces to help reduce their carbon impact and offer their employees easy charging. Workplace charging is a sensible and great way to charge if you have the option. Not all workplaces will have charging points; you might want to chat with your boss if yours doesn’t.

Businesses can apply for grants for charging spaces like landlords can, so installing one might be worth their time. Generally, work chargers are slow and use the universal socket, so you’ll need to bring your own cable to use one.

Charging Vans

Charging vans aren’t an option for most people as there aren’t many services in the country. However, some, like Charge Fairy in London, enable you to charge your car from outside your home. To charge your EV, they fit a charger into their van and simply connect your vehicle to their power source.

Their speeds are slow and relatively expensive, and this service isn’t offered everywhere, but it is a very convenient way of charging your car and a good alternative to home charging.

The On-Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme (ORCS)

If none of the options outlined above is to your liking, you might be interested in contacting your local council and asking them to install a local charging point. ORCS is a government scheme organised by your local council that sets up charging points in areas to allow people to charge who can’t afford or don’t have a home charging point.

There might be one in your area already, but if there isn’t, it might be worth your time to ask your local council about one. ORCS charging points are generally installed in discrete locations like lamp posts. To use them, you must bring your own cable.

Should You Buy An EV If You Don’t Own A Driveway?

As this article outlines, you have many charging options if you don’t own a driveway. Public chargers are spread out across the country, so there is surely one near you; with discounts from Bonnet, public charging can be very affordable.

In 2030, there will be a ban on all new conventional petrol and diesel vehicles. In preparation for this date, the UK has become increasingly EV-friendly, and more charging infrastructure has been added to support the increased number of drivers.

So even if there isn’t a charging option near you right now, there will certainly be one soon. Electric cars are still cost-effective to charge and are great to use, so if you’re on the fence, why not become an early adopter?

Find The Best Public Charging Points With Bonnet

Bonnet is the ideal way to find the best chargers near you and access them at a discount. A diverse range of charging networks work with our app, ensuring all our customers can always find a charger that suits their requirements.

Each charging network generally requires you to download an app before they let you charge at their points. If you charge at many networks, this can build up, and you’ll soon clutter your phone with countless apps just to access a handful of networks. Bonnet lets you connect to 17 charging networks with just one app.

If you’re interested in finding the best chargers for you, whether you have a home charging point or not, you should download Bonnet today.

Steps to a successful installation at a single-family home

If you’re a single-family homeowner with an EV, installing a Level 2 charger in your garage or carport, or near your driveway makes charging a breeze. So it’s worth doing it right.

If you live in an apartment or condo, the steps are slightly different.

Find an electrician

Need help finding an electrician? Request an EV electrician referral to get in touch with qualified electricians from our Alliance of Energy Professionals.

To protect your home and your EV, we strongly recommend hiring a certified electrician who has completed the Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training program to get the job done properly and safely – and to enable you to claim a rebate.

Once you’ve hired a certified electrician, follow the steps below to complete your installation and apply for your rebate.

Step 1: Determine your home’s eligibility

Confirm with your municipality or Technical Safety BC to make sure that your home is eligible for a charger installation.

Step 2: Confirm you have sufficient electrical service

Check to see if you’ve got sufficient electricity flowing into your home to support an EV charger. If you need to upgrade your service, learn about electrical service extensions and then contact BC Hydro’s Express Connect team at 1 877 520 1355.

Step 3: Confirm your electrical panel has space

Check to see if there’s enough space on your electrical panel to accommodate a circuit breaker for the EV charger. If not, you’ll need an electrician to help.

Step 4: Purchase a charger

Choose and purchase an EV charger.

Step 5: Obtain an electrical permit

Apply to your municipality (or Technical Safety BC) for an electrical permit. If you hire an electrician, they will do this for you.

Step 6: Charger installation

Install the EV charging station. Remember that you must get a safety officer to inspect your electrical work before any wiring is concealed or connected to a supply source. Your electrician needs to complete the contractor consultation form after the installation is complete. You’ll need this when you apply for a rebate.

Step 7: Inspection

Have the installation inspected by your municipality (or Technical Safety BC). If an electrician did the installation, they will do this for you.

Charging considerations

Before you start the installation process, consider these things:

Consult with an electrician to perform an electrical service size calculation for your home based on the Canadian Electrical Code. This will help you determine whether you have sufficiently sized electrical service coming in to your home to support EV charging, or whether you need to budget for upgrading your electrical service to 200- or 400-Amp. Charges and fees for electrical service connections

Of course, you don’t need a Level 2 charging station to power your EV. You can use a Level 1 charger plugged into a standard outlet, it’ll just take more time. If you use your EV mainly for commuting, then it can just sit and charge all evening after you get home. It’s even possible to own an EV without charging at home and just take advantage of charging stations at work or at one of the more than 2,500 publicly available chargers in B.C., including a growing network of fast charging stations.

Related content

EV charger rebates for single-family homes

Copyright © 2023 BC Hydro. All Rights Reserved.

Rebates for single-family homes

EV charger rebates for single-family homes are currently unavailable.

Visit the EV charger rebate program for information.

If installed at an apartment/condo or workplace, this networked charger may be eligible for a rebate.

Rebates for apartments/condos

Get up to 5,000 in rebates, up to 50% of costs, per charger to purchase and install Level 2 networked EV chargers at your building’s residential parking spaces, to a maximum of 25,000.

Rebate amounts vary depending on factors such as whether or not the building is participating in other EV Ready rebates.

Rebates for workplaces

Up to 5,000 per charger to purchase and install eligible Level 2 networked EV chargers for employee use, to a maximum of 25,000.

Pre-approval from BC Hydro is required for apartment/condo and workplace customers. Program maximums apply.

Features

Load management: Allows multiple EV chargers to share the same electrical circuit, allowing the charging power to be distributed across each charger.

Networked: A networked charging station that is connected to a central system via internet communication such as open protocol (e.g. OCPP, OpenADR or other) or a proprietary system (must be connected to a network for minimum of two years).

Multiple ports: Allows multiple vehicles to charge at the same time.

CSA Certification: Tested and certified electric vehicle charging and components by CSA Group.

cETL Certification: Compliant with North American safety standards and tested/certified by Intertek.

cUL Certification: Compliant with Canadian safety standards by UL Canada.

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