DUCT, EV CHARGER. Toyota ev charger

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What is Covered

Toyota warrants that it will either provide a replacement part or repair any Toyota part or accessory that is defective in material or workmanship. This warranty applies to new or remanufactured parts which are Toyota Genuine Parts. Toyota Genuine Parts are defined as all Toyota parts and accessories that are either manufactured or specifically approved by Toyota Motor Corporation and sold by TMS or its authorized Private Distributors to authorized Dealers.

Parts Purchases. With the exception of 12V batteries, Toyota Genuine Parts purchased over-the-counter or online from an authorized Toyota Dealer, but installed by a third party on the applicable Toyota or Lexus model vehicle, carry a 12-month parts only warranty from the date of purchase.

Service Part Warranty. The warranty for Toyota Genuine Parts purchased and installed by an authorized Dealer on the applicable Toyota or Lexus model vehicle, is 12 months, regardless of mileage, from the install date or the remainder of any applicable New Vehicle Limited Warranty, whichever provides greater coverage.

12 Volt Battery Limited Warranty

TrueStart batteries are warranted as free exchange from the date of purchase for 24 months, regardless of mileage, or the remainder of the New Vehicle Limited Warranty, whichever provides greater coverage, and on a prorated basis thereafter for up to 84 months. Proration is for the battery only (based on MSRP) and excludes applicable taxes, labor for installation and towing.

True-2 batteries are warranted as free exchange from the date of purchase for 18 months, regardless of mileage, and on a prorated basis thereafter for up to 60 months. Free exchange excludes labor for installation and towing. Proration is for the battery only (based on MSRP) and excludes applicable taxes, labor for installation and towing.

Hybrid System High Voltage Battery Limited Warranty

Hybrid system high-voltage (HV) batteries installed by an authorized Toyota Dealer (excluding commercial, fleet or livery vehicles) are warranted for 36 months, regardless of mileage, from the date the part(s) was installed on the vehicle or the remainder of the New Vehicle Limited Warranty, whichever provides greater coverage.

HV batteries not installed by an authorized Toyota Dealer, and/or installed on commercial, fleet or livery vehicles, will be covered under the 12-month Toyota Service Parts Limited Warranty.

Tires Limited Warranty

Tires are warranted independently by the tire manufacturer. See manufacturer’s statement for details.

What is Not Covered

This Limited Warranty does not apply where the vehicle mileage cannot be determined or has been altered.

Damage to a Toyota part or accessory caused by a non- genuine or unauthorized part or component is not covered.

Labor for removal from vehicle and reinstallation of a part or accessory sold “over-the-counter” is not covered.

Labor, parts, and other costs (such as all lubricants) connected with recommended maintenance service are not covered.

Service adjustments, such as calibration or alignments are not covered.

Failures or damages resulting from improper installation, removal, repair, misuse, negligence, accidents, or modification of the part or the accessory are not covered.

Incidental or consequential damages resulting from breach of this written warranty or any implied warranty (such as telephone calls, loss of time, lost opportunities, inconvenience, or commercial loss) are not covered.

Any implied warranties, including those of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose, are limited to the applicable duration of this written warranty.

Some states do not allow limitation on how long an implied warranty lasts, or the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so the above limitations or exclusions may not apply to you.

This is the only warranty authorized by Toyota. The performance of repairs or the replacement of the part are the exclusive remedies under this warranty or any implied warranty. Toyota does not authorize any person to create for it any other obligation or liability in connection with Toyota Parts or Accessories. This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state.

Owner’s Responsibilities

To obtain this warranty coverage, return the part or accessory, or vehicle to which it is attached, to any authorized Toyota or Lexus Dealer (depending on the type of part and vehicle at issue). Proof of original purchase is required to qualify for this warranty.

For Information regarding this limited warranty, please contact your dealership or call Toyota toll-free at (800) 331-4331// Lexus toll-free (800) 255-3987.

Requests in writing should be sent to:

P.O. Box 259001, Plano, TX 75025-9001

I road-tripped in Toyota’s new electric SUV. Its painfully slow charging and short range made the drive take forever.

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  • I drove the new Toyota bZ4X electric SUV from New York to Washington DC, and back.
  • The nine-hour drive involved three hours of charging.
  • I learned the hard way that sometimes you need to choose between staying warm and maximizing range.

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Electric cars are quick, quiet, and kind to the planet, but limited range and lengthy charging times mean road trips aren’t exactly their strong suit.

That’s what I learned when I took Toyota’s new bZ4X SUV from New York to Washington DC one weekend in early April. The 500-mile journey wasn’t some epic coast-to-coast adventure, but rather the kind of long-haul drive someone might casually take a few times per year and not think twice about — if they’re behind the wheel of a regular gas car.

In a battery-powered vehicle, though, things aren’t always that simple.

Charging can take a frustratingly long time

Let’s nerd out for just one moment to establish some basic concepts.

Every EV has a maximum charging rate, expressed in kilowatts (kW), that governs the amount of power it can accept from roadside fast chargers. For the bZ4X AWD Toyota provided, that’s an uncompetitive 100 kW. The higher an EV’s rating, the faster you can hypothetically charge — so long as you find a charging plug whose rating is equal or greater.

But you don’t always achieve that max charge rate due to the charger, the temperature of the battery, or, in my case, settings built into the vehicle itself. During my trip, the car never got close to 100 kW, leading to some excruciating charging times.

Toyota engineered the SUV to prioritize battery longevity, a spokesperson said, which means putting a damper on fast charging, which can accelerate battery wear.

On the way down to DC, I pulled into an Electrify America station with a 37% charge, looking to add just enough energy to make it the rest of the way. The Toyota refused to pull more than 35 kW, so just getting to 74% took a full 45 minutes of waiting around — not exactly something you want to do at night when you still have hours of driving ahead of you.

That stint added 95 miles of range, according to the SUV’s estimates. But highway speeds sap energy quickly, so in real-world terms, it was probably more like 75.

On the return trip, I stopped at an EVgo station with 6% remaining. This time, the Toyota wouldn’t budge past 50 kW, so charging to 80% took an agonizing hour and 15 minutes. That left me with a bit more range than I wound up needing, and I got home with about 25% to spare.

duct, charger, toyota

Total it all up and charging stops added two hours of travel time on top of the roughly nine-hour trip.

But this experience isn’t universal. Teslas charge quickly and benefit from an expansive, private charging network. Some Hyundai batteries can charge to nearly full in the time it takes to find a bathroom and grab some beef jerky. Many vehicles beat the Toyota’s so-so 222-mile range, cutting down the frequency and urgency of pit stops.

You need to leave yourself a big range buffer

Each time I charged up, I made sure to create a comfortable buffer between the distance Google Maps said I had left and the Toyota’s remaining range, as indicated on its screen. I’ve run out of range too far from a charging station before, and it wasn’t fun.

That turned out to be a savvy move. Factors like high speeds, inclines, and — as we’ll discuss in more detail later — use of the climate settings can deplete an EV’s range faster than expected. So unless you know your EV well, don’t blindly trust what it tells you.

Here’s an example. When I left the Electrify America station in New Jersey and set off for DC, the Toyota indicated 188 miles of range— plenty to drive the 138 miles remaining, right? Nope.

I watched my beautiful buffer wither away to just 11 miles by the time I arrived, triggering an unsettling message telling me to charge soon. A couple of wrong turns dropped my final range to just nine miles.

Since charging stations aren’t nearly as abundant or well-marked as gas pumps, you need to carefully plot out your pit stops in advance to avoid a bad time.

You can charge while you do other things

One of the bright spots of driving an EV is you don’t need to sit in your car while it charges. If you aren’t en route somewhere, you can plug in and go about your day.

The morning after I arrived in DC, I checked the car and saw its range had dropped overnight to six miles. Since I didn’t want to sit through a full hour of charging right before hitting the road back home the next day, I looked for a charger in the city and found some EVgo stalls near Union Station.

I drove over, plugged in, and went sightseeing for a couple of hours. All the while, I was able to check the car’s charging progress through the EVgo app on my phone. This was the best charging session I had all weekend: 3% to 77% in an hour, that particular charger‘s time limit.

Better yet, the EVgo app provided a QR code to flash at the gate so I could leave the parking lot without paying.

Still, it was a bummer that I had to take time out of my day and drive to a charging station. If the garage at the apartment I was staying in had had a charger of its own, that would’ve made the whole trip much more seamless.

Prepare to choose between comfort and range

A combustion-engine car creates heat as a byproduct, so cranking up the radiator is no big deal. But electric cars use energy from their batteries to make heat, leaving drivers choosing between maximum range and maximum comfort.

I hit the road back to New York on a chilly morning with 176 miles of range. When I went to turn on the heat, the indicated range plummeted to 125 miles. The options became: Stay toasty and charge twice, or endure the cold and stick with the planned one-stop strategy. Given the bZ4X’s lackluster range and my previous, lengthy experiences charging it, I went with the latter.

I bundled up and relied mostly on the seat and steering-wheel warmers (which are more efficient than the regular heater) to make things almost bearable. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t curse these silly electric cars under my breath once or twice.

But the electric future seems inevitable at this point, so we might as well learn to live with it.

Are you an electric-car owner with a story to share? Contact this reporter at tlevin@insider.com

The Ultimate Guide to Charging a Toyota Prius Plug-In

With various features that make it simple for drivers to reduce fuel costs, the Toyota Prius Plug-In is one of the market’s most effective plug-in electric vehicles (PHEVs). It combines a petrol engine and electric motor with a supersized battery made from the regular Prius for more extended and all-electric driving.

Because of its larger battery, you must charge it for two hours to give its two motors the power they require, but you can travel up to 34 miles on zero gasoline.

A plug-in hybrid has significantly lower CO2 numbers than a regular hybrid. This feature is essential for company car users because the benefit-in-kind (BIK) car tax rate depends on the vehicle’s emissions and its range on electricity alone.

The Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In, Volkswagen Golf GTE, SEAT Leon e-Hybrid, and upscale Mercedes A 250 e are just a few of the vehicles the Toyota Prius competes against for features.

With cutting-edge technology installed, the Prius Plug-In has an appropriate price tag of almost £32,000. The Prius Plug-In seeks to convince sceptics with fuel efficiency ratings of up to 217 mpg and emissions of 29 g/km CO2. While its official consumption will be difficult to match, the Prius is one of the most cost-effective plug-in vehicles yielding between 60 and 70 mpg even when the battery pack isn’t charged.

It’s also pretty enjoyable to drive, seamlessly switching between its electric and petrol motors when necessary, even with an extra burst of speed. Although it has more body lean on quicker routes than the standard Prius, Audi, or Volkswagen, it handles well in towns, where the Prius has traditionally performed well.

How Do Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Work?

Plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEVs) have a gas engine and an electric motor, allowing them to run on gas only when necessary or plug in to charge their batteries.

PHEV batteries can be charged using a wall outlet or charging equipment, by the internal combustion engine (ICE), or through regenerative braking. The vehicle typically runs on electric power until the battery is nearly empty, at which point it automatically switches to gas.

If the majority of the time, you want to drive electric to reduce your emissions and save on fuel costs, it’s highly feasible. However, a plug-in hybrid can be a more suitable option if you’re uncertain whether to try electric because you don’t have access to charging at home or work and wish to make long trips without charging.

How to Charge a Plug-In Hybrid Toyota Prius?

When charging a PHEV, you must first insert the connections into the proper inlet. Toyota Prius Plug-In’s Type 2 inlet is located on the off-side of the rear 3/4 panel, where a petrol flap would typically be located.

The Toyota Prius Plug-In uses the Type 2 charging standard, commonly used at home or in public slow and fast AC points.

As with most PHEVs, the Prius Plug-In does not have Rapid charging capabilities. It can charge fast and slow from public points depending on the network and the type of charge unit. Generally, fast charging requires a Type 2-to-Type 2 cable, while slow charging requires a 3-pin-to-Type 2 cable, both of which come with the vehicle.

After plugging in, the car communicates with the charging unit to verify that there is power available, there are no faults, and it is safe to begin charging.

Charging time for a Toyota Prius

Rarely does anyone need to charge their car from empty to full. Usually, you will simply “top up” your car’s battery for two to three hours overnight. By topping off your PHEV, you can maximise your range and reduce the length of time spent charging.

The table below provides an approximate time of how long it takes to charge a Toyota Prius Plug-In. Times are based on a full charge.

Where Can You Charge a Plug-In Toyota Prius?

If at home or at a work charging point, you can automatically charge your PHEV. While in public stations, an activation process is necessary to start charging.

Some network providers may require an RFID card or smartphone app linked to an existing account to use their services.

Applications like Bonnet, which partners with an extensive network of charging point partners around the UK and in Europe, can be used when you’re in a bind and need to find a charging station along your trip.

Unlike many electric car charging stations that require payment or membership for you to work on-premises, Bonnet makes life easier for all electric vehicle owners without setting up an account. You can just download the EV charging app and use it to find the closest charger.

The Bonnet EV charging app offers low and makes the EV charging experience super simple and convenient wherever your journey takes you.

Charging at Home or Shared Parking

Much like charging your laptop or cell phone, charging a plug-in hybrid at home is a simple process.

Simply plug the charging cable with the car into a standard wall outlet. This method will add roughly 4 miles of range per hour to your Prius battery and take about five and a half hours to complete.

Upgrading to a Level 2 home charger can fully charge your Prius in under 2 hours, which is faster if you want to make several all-electric daily trips.

A hybrid is viable if you can’t charge at home because you’ll have a gas tank whenever you need it.

On the other hand, using an interactive map, the Bonnet EV charging app can help you find the nearest available electric car charging point.

Charging at Work

Workplace charging is a convenient way to top up your PHEV while at work. From a business perspective, a workplace charging point will become an increasingly vital provision for employees and visitors.

Under the Workplace Charging Scheme (WCS), the Government offers financial assistance to businesses, charities, and public sector organisations that meet applicant and site eligibility criteria to install charging points at their premises.

Charging on Public Networks

There are many public EV charging networks in the UK, some exclusive in certain areas while others provide nationwide coverage. Popular networks include Charge Your Car, Pod Point, Ecotricity, and BP Chargemaster (Polar).

While many EV charging stations are free to use, most fast and Rapid chargers cost money.

Depending on the network, some accept payments with RFID cards, and others require users to download a smartphone app.

Cost to Charge a Toyota Prius Plug-In Hybrid

A standard charging tariff includes a flat connection fee, a cost per charging hour (1p/h), or a cost per kWh consumed (1p/kWh). The cost of charging your PHEV varies between home, work and public networks.

The table below shows an estimate.

Assumes a 28p/kWh tariff rate. Home charging costs will depend on your electricity rate.

Assumes most network Rapid chargers will have a 44p/kWh tariff rate by April 2022.

Because the cost of charging differs significantly between EV charging stations and networks, Bonnet’s Boosts Membership options guarantee savings of 10%-15% from standard market rates for charging.

Takeaway

The ability to drive electric most of the time and access gasoline when needed has encouraged many people to drive electric.

But to take advantage of the car’s all-electric range and maximise the overall efficiency and operating costs, you must recharge after most, if not all, travels.

Hence, a Prius Plug-in might not be the best option for you if plugging in where you live isn’t convenient or an option.

However, you might choose a Prius Plug-in Hybrid if charging is accessible and you want a spacious, comfortable, easy-to-drive, well-equipped, and exceptionally efficient car.

FAQs

What happens if you don’t charge a plug-in hybrid?

It is possible to drive the PHEV in the regular hybrid mode without charging. Although plug-in hybrids can run on gasoline or electricity, they’re best driven with fully charged batteries.

How often should you charge a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle?

It depends on how much you drive it. You’ll probably need to recharge every day if you commute frequently. It’s ideal to do this overnight since you’ll have the time to recharge and only use electricity during off-peak hours.

Do plug-in hybrid charge while driving?

Since a PHEV has a larger battery pack, its engine will charge the batteries slightly when needed, but not fully. It would be best if you plugged in your PHEV to achieve its full zero-emission benefits.

How fast can a Prius go on electric only?

84mph. The Prius Plug-in has a range of 34 miles and a maximum speed of 84 mph, but not both simultaneously because the faster you go, the faster the battery drains.

Can you drive a Prius on electric only?

duct, charger, toyota

No. It would be best if you never drove Prius Prime without gasoline in the tank. In some cases, you may drive in electric mode alone, but the vehicle always requires gasoline to operate properly.

Plan, plug pay for every EV journey with Bonnet

24/7 live updates from every charger to ensure top class reliability every time you charge. Join 130,000 EV Drivers.

Why Choose a Toyota Prius Plug-in?

With various features that make it simple for drivers to reduce fuel costs, the Toyota Prius Plug-In is one of the market’s most effective plug-in electric vehicles (PHEVs). It combines a petrol engine and electric motor with a supersized battery made from the regular Prius for more extended and all-electric driving.

Because of its larger battery, you must charge it for two hours to give its two motors the power they require, but you can travel up to 34 miles on zero gasoline.

A plug-in hybrid has significantly lower CO2 numbers than a regular hybrid. This feature is essential for company car users because the benefit-in-kind (BIK) car tax rate depends on the vehicle’s emissions and its range on electricity alone.

The Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In, Volkswagen Golf GTE, SEAT Leon e-Hybrid, and upscale Mercedes A 250 e are just a few of the vehicles the Toyota Prius competes against for features.

With cutting-edge technology installed, the Prius Plug-In has an appropriate price tag of almost £32,000. The Prius Plug-In seeks to convince sceptics with fuel efficiency ratings of up to 217 mpg and emissions of 29 g/km CO2. While its official consumption will be difficult to match, the Prius is one of the most cost-effective plug-in vehicles yielding between 60 and 70 mpg even when the battery pack isn’t charged.

It’s also pretty enjoyable to drive, seamlessly switching between its electric and petrol motors when necessary, even with an extra burst of speed. Although it has more body lean on quicker routes than the standard Prius, Audi, or Volkswagen, it handles well in towns, where the Prius has traditionally performed well.

How Do Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Work?

Plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEVs) have a gas engine and an electric motor, allowing them to run on gas only when necessary or plug in to charge their batteries.

PHEV batteries can be charged using a wall outlet or charging equipment, by the internal combustion engine (ICE), or through regenerative braking. The vehicle typically runs on electric power until the battery is nearly empty, at which point it automatically switches to gas.

If the majority of the time, you want to drive electric to reduce your emissions and save on fuel costs, it’s highly feasible. However, a plug-in hybrid can be a more suitable option if you’re uncertain whether to try electric because you don’t have access to charging at home or work and wish to make long trips without charging.

How to Charge a Plug-In Hybrid Toyota Prius?

When charging a PHEV, you must first insert the connections into the proper inlet. Toyota Prius Plug-In’s Type 2 inlet is located on the off-side of the rear 3/4 panel, where a petrol flap would typically be located.

The Toyota Prius Plug-In uses the Type 2 charging standard, commonly used at home or in public slow and fast AC points.

As with most PHEVs, the Prius Plug-In does not have Rapid charging capabilities. It can charge fast and slow from public points depending on the network and the type of charge unit. Generally, fast charging requires a Type 2-to-Type 2 cable, while slow charging requires a 3-pin-to-Type 2 cable, both of which come with the vehicle.

After plugging in, the car communicates with the charging unit to verify that there is power available, there are no faults, and it is safe to begin charging.

Charging time for a Toyota Prius

Rarely does anyone need to charge their car from empty to full. Usually, you will simply “top up” your car’s battery for two to three hours overnight. By topping off your PHEV, you can maximise your range and reduce the length of time spent charging.

The table below provides an approximate time of how long it takes to charge a Toyota Prius Plug-In. Times are based on a full charge.

Where Can You Charge a Plug-In Toyota Prius?

If at home or at a work charging point, you can automatically charge your PHEV. While in public stations, an activation process is necessary to start charging.

Some network providers may require an RFID card or smartphone app linked to an existing account to use their services.

Applications like Bonnet, which partners with an extensive network of charging point partners around the UK and in Europe, can be used when you’re in a bind and need to find a charging station along your trip.

Unlike many electric car charging stations that require payment or membership for you to work on-premises, Bonnet makes life easier for all electric vehicle owners without setting up an account. You can just download the EV charging app and use it to find the closest charger.

The Bonnet EV charging app offers low and makes the EV charging experience super simple and convenient wherever your journey takes you.

Charging at Home or Shared Parking

Much like charging your laptop or cell phone, charging a plug-in hybrid at home is a simple process.

Simply plug the charging cable with the car into a standard wall outlet. This method will add roughly 4 miles of range per hour to your Prius battery and take about five and a half hours to complete.

Upgrading to a Level 2 home charger can fully charge your Prius in under 2 hours, which is faster if you want to make several all-electric daily trips.

A hybrid is viable if you can’t charge at home because you’ll have a gas tank whenever you need it.

On the other hand, using an interactive map, the Bonnet EV charging app can help you find the nearest available electric car charging point.

Charging at Work

Workplace charging is a convenient way to top up your PHEV while at work. From a business perspective, a workplace charging point will become an increasingly vital provision for employees and visitors.

Under the Workplace Charging Scheme (WCS), the Government offers financial assistance to businesses, charities, and public sector organisations that meet applicant and site eligibility criteria to install charging points at their premises.

Charging on Public Networks

There are many public EV charging networks in the UK, some exclusive in certain areas while others provide nationwide coverage. Popular networks include Charge Your Car, Pod Point, Ecotricity, and BP Chargemaster (Polar).

While many EV charging stations are free to use, most fast and Rapid chargers cost money.

Depending on the network, some accept payments with RFID cards, and others require users to download a smartphone app.

Cost to Charge a Toyota Prius Plug-In Hybrid

A standard charging tariff includes a flat connection fee, a cost per charging hour (1p/h), or a cost per kWh consumed (1p/kWh). The cost of charging your PHEV varies between home, work and public networks.

The table below shows an estimate.

Assumes a 28p/kWh tariff rate. Home charging costs will depend on your electricity rate.

Assumes most network Rapid chargers will have a 44p/kWh tariff rate by April 2022.

Because the cost of charging differs significantly between EV charging stations and networks, Bonnet’s Boosts Membership options guarantee savings of 10%-15% from standard market rates for charging.

Takeaway

The ability to drive electric most of the time and access gasoline when needed has encouraged many people to drive electric.

But to take advantage of the car’s all-electric range and maximise the overall efficiency and operating costs, you must recharge after most, if not all, travels.

duct, charger, toyota

Hence, a Prius Plug-in might not be the best option for you if plugging in where you live isn’t convenient or an option.

However, you might choose a Prius Plug-in Hybrid if charging is accessible and you want a spacious, comfortable, easy-to-drive, well-equipped, and exceptionally efficient car.

Subscribe to our newsletter to receive monthly updates and offers from Bonnet HQ.

Toyota EV’s 1,942-km non-stop trip shows wireless charging works

Two of the major hurdles in the electric-vehicle segment are range anxiety and battery size. Now, a just-completed 100-hour demonstration by Israeli start-up Electreon saw a Toyota RAV4 PHEV travel 1,942 kilometres without stopping to charge. How is that possible? By covering the distance utilizing Electreon’s proprietary wireless electric-road technology, the RAV4’s lightweight 18-kWh battery was never depleted, and maintained a charge from the specially equipped roadway.

Start your engines! Driving.ca is Canada’s leading destination for the latest automotive news, reviews, photos and video.

The successful application of the technology set a new world record for the longest time and distance ever driven (non-stop) by a passenger EV. The Electreon team’s goal was to drive around 1,500 km during the five-day test, but it instead successfully completed the demonstration with 33 per cent more driven kilometres.

Over the 100-hour-straight driving rally, 56 different drivers – 48 of which were members of the Electreon team – and Israeli racing driver Bar Baruch participated in the effort to drive for over five successive days. The vehicle would only stop momentarily to switch drivers (without switching off the engine) and never for dedicated charging downtime. The demonstration track is just 200 metres (one-eighth of a mile) in length, with only 25 per cent of the track electrified.

Start your engines! Driving.ca is Canada’s leading destination for the latest automotive news, reviews, photos and video.

Two Volvo XC40 Recharge taxi cabs at a wireless charging taxi stand in Gothenburg, Sweden. Photo by Volvo

According to the company, during the drive, the wireless EV charging technology increased the RAV4’s range at least 26 times more than the current vehicle’s real-world maximum range limits. That’s based on the all-electric range of the PHEV being pegged at 75 kilometres.

The company’s shared charging platform, which is battery-technology agnostic, supports multiple users simultaneously, from small passenger vehicles to large e-trucks. The appeal of this kind of charging technology is obvious and layered, including eliminating the need for large batteries in vehicles and providing extended, arguably unlimited, range.

With the successful world record effort achieved, next up for Electreon is the installation of its wireless electric road technology in downtown Detroit this summer. Indeed, Detroit made TIME’s “World’s Greatest Places” list for being selected as the home of the U.S.A.’s first electric-vehicle-charging road.

Start your engines! Driving.ca is Canada’s leading destination for the latest automotive news, reviews, photos and video.

Wirelessly charging an EV actually works

What has made this century’s electric vehicle revolution so enjoyable to cover as a journalist is the H.G. Wells-ian, flight-of-fancy technology combined with the P.T. Barnum-esque hype that accompanies it.

Who can forget battery-swapping stations, where you’d simply pull your low-battery EV into a stall and a multi-fangled machine underneath would remove the depleted battery and install a fully charged one in the matter of minutes? Then there was the idea that drones would be used to transport fully charged batteries to stranded EVs. Or my personal favourite, the story that a Zimbabwean inventor had created a chargeless electric vehicle, instead using radio frequencies to create energy to power the vehicle.

Start your engines! Driving.ca is Canada’s leading destination for the latest automotive news, reviews, photos and video.

The specially equipped XC40 Recharge features a wireless charging adaptor that sits 14 centimetres above the charge pad. Photo by Andrew McCredie

But amidst these outlandish ideas, and their subsequent claims of absolute veracity (inevitably accompanied with ‘invest now’ promotions), there are the occasional ones that actually work and are put in practice. Take the ‘electrified road,’ which promises to recharge an EV simply by driving along a road outfitted with an electrified track. Well, there are just such ‘Smart’ roads in several places in the world, including Sweden, Italy and Detroit.

The promise of EV wireless charging

Which brings us to wireless charging. Another somewhat wild concept that has been around for years as an idea. Think of it as charging your vehicle like charging your smartphone on a wireless charge pad, though the vehicle will not touch the pad. than five years ago I was ushered, after my cellphone was taken from me, into a windowless white room at Nissan’s Yokohama RD lab to see a static display of a Nissan Leaf parked on a one-square metre pad. “Wireless charging!” I was told through an interpreter, however no demonstration nor details of how, and if, it worked were forthcoming.

Start your engines! Driving.ca is Canada’s leading destination for the latest automotive news, reviews, photos and video.

Last year at VW’s battery laboratory in Tennessee, there was a VW ID.4 parked over what appeared to be a similar charge pad in the parking lot, but when I asked my guide about it, I was told he had no information on it, nor would he ask anyone about it. I was, however, allowed to take pictures.

Call me skeptical, but I was beginning to put wireless charging into the same category as our Zimbabwe friend. Then I went to Gothenburg, Sweden a few weeks ago and not only learned how wireless charging works, but I sat in a public taxi that pulled up to a charge pad and began charging. For the past year, 20 Volvo XC40 Recharge taxi cabs have been using four wireless charge pads in the Gothenburg Green City Zone, under which designated areas within the city are used as live testbeds for the development of sustainable technologies. Volvo is working in collaboration with Pennsylvania-based InductEV on the wireless charging technology.

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How do wireless EV charging stations work?

The charging station sends energy through the charging pad, which is picked up by a receiver unit in the car that is 14 centimetres from the pad. The taxis use the XC40’s existing 360-degree camera system to help the driver align the car with the charging pad. Each taxi is outfitted with a special charge adapter on the bottom of the vehicle between the front wheels. For the fully electric XC40 Recharge cars, the wireless charging power is more than 40 kW, making the charging speeds some four times faster than a wired 11-kW AC charger and almost as fast as a wired 50-kW DC fast charger. Even if the pad is covered in snow or ice or dirt, it still works.

The charging starts automatically when a compatible vehicle parks over a charging pad embedded in the street, in this case a taxi stand. The driver does not need to get out of the car, or for that matter even press any buttons to begin charging. The only thing that will make charging not work is if there is a piece of metal on the pad.

Start your engines! Driving.ca is Canada’s leading destination for the latest automotive news, reviews, photos and video.

“Gothenburg Green City Zone lets us try exciting new technologies in a real environment and evaluate them over time for a potential future broader introduction,” said Mats Moberg, head of Research and Development at Volvo Cars. “Testing new charging technologies together with selected partners is a good way to evaluate alternative charging options for our future cars.”

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The Gothenburg Green City Zone initiative aims to achieve emission-free transport by the year 2030, by using a real city as a testing ground. According to Moberg, Volvo’s participation will enable the company to accelerate development of technologies and services in the areas of electrification, shared mobility, autonomous driving, connectivity and safety.

Had I not seen it with my own eyes, I still wouldn’t believe it, but wireless charging an electric vehicle is real. Believe the technology and the hype.

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