Charging Your Vehicle. Public charging points

Get up to speed with EV charging.

Boost your all-electric knowledge with videos that simplify electricity and charging concepts.

Find out what you need to know about the charging process—whether in the convenience of home or on the go.

Set up your at-home charging station.

Prius Prime LE shown in Blue Magnetism

How to install a Level 2 charger.

You just need a licensed electrician to install it. Here are some equipment and installation options:

ChargePoint® Home Flex can charge your EV in the comfort of your own garage.

Need help finding an electrician? Qmerit can connect you with a licensed electrician near you.

Charging has gone public.

Juice up on the go by tapping into a network of public charging stations.

bZ4X Limited shown in Heavy Metal with Black roof

Finding a station has never been easier.

With currently over 30,000 public stations supporting Level 2 and DC Fast Charging, charging on the go is more convenient than ever. Just pull up, plug in, and charge up. And Toyota is working with ChargePoint and EVgo to help make tapping into their networks even easier.

Customers who purchase or lease a new 2023 Toyota bZ4X will get one year of unlimited complimentary charging at all EVgo-owned and operated public charging stations nationwide.

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Charging Stations In Your Area

Charger Types

  • Level 2 Charger Supports: bZ4X, RAV4 Prime, Prius Prime
  • Level 3 Charger Supports: bZ4X

Charging Networks

  • ChargePoint
  • EVgo

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We’re having trouble loading your map. Apologies for any inconvenience.

Toyota does not own or operate the stations and is not responsible for their availability or performance. Click on station name for address.

0% of charging energy matched with renewable energy.

Clean Assist allows eligible All-Electric Vehicle owners nationwide and Plug-In Hybrid Vehicle owners in California to offset their vehicle charging with 100% renewable energy—no matter where the vehicles are plugged in. And there’s no cost to participate in the program.

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How it Works

Owners of eligible vehicles can opt into the Toyota Clean Assist program through the Toyota App. Active Remote Connect Trial or Subscription required.

The Toyota App then tracks the amount of the electricity used during charging and calculates the net emissions produced by charging.

Toyota then generates, or buys, an equivalent amount of Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs), ensuring that all charging activity is matched with zero-carbon electricity.

Vehicle Benefits

Feel the smooth acceleration, instant torque delivery and quiet drive—all advantages of the electric motor over an internal combustion engine.

Reducing CO2 emissions by going fully electric is one way we can lessen our impact on the environment.

All-Electric and Plug-In Hybrid vehicles can bring about potential state incentives. Preliminary expectations include a lower cost of ownership, including overall service and maintenance costs.

FAQs

What are the different types of electrified vehicles?

Electrified vehicles come in four flavors: hybrid, plug-in hybrid, fuel cell, and all-electric (referred to as Battery EVs, BEVs, or simply EVs).

Toyota offers a wide range of hybrids and plug-in hybrids, as well as the fuel cell Mirai in California, and the all-electric bZ4X. Discover this growing lineup at toyota.com/electrified.

Why drive an all-electric vehicle?

Three words: convenience, fun and savings.

All-electric vehicles can be conveniently charged at home, overnight and on-demand, as well as at public charging stations when out and about. No more trips to the gas station needed.

They’re also fun to drive, thanks to the immediate torque response from the electric motors, as well as the smooth acceleration and quiet cabin.

Drivers won’t just save money by avoiding the gas pump, either—they may also be able to enjoy state incentives, as well as the potential long-term maintenance savings typical of an all-electric powertrain.

And as icing on the cake, driving an all-electric vehicle can also help the environment by reducing CO2 emissions.

What is the all-electric vehicle driving experience like?

Thanks to the use of electric motors instead of internal combustion engines, all-electric vehicles provide smooth acceleration, immediate torque response and a surprisingly quiet ride experience.

How far will an all-electric vehicle go?

The driving range of an all-electric vehicle will vary depending on how/where you drive, charging habits, accessory use, outside temperature and other factors. Battery capacity also decreases with time and use, which will reduce range.

What can impact driving range?

All-electric driving range may decrease significantly depending on speed, outside temperature, accessory use, how/where you drive, charging habits, and other factors. Battery capacity also decreases with time and use which will reduce range.

Where can I charge an all-electric vehicle?

All-electric vehicles can be charged at home with Level 1 or Level 2 charging solutions, or at public charging stations with Level 2 and Level 3.

Many public charging networks, like ChargePoint and EVgo, further simplify the charging process by providing app-based charger access and payment.

What are the different charging levels?

There are three different all-electric vehicle charging levels.

Level 1 is the basic charging solution. Primarily for home use, Level 1 charging cables plug directly into a standard wall outlet. They are usually included with the vehicle and are totally portable, so they can go where you and your vehicle go. This is the slowest option, however, with all-electric vehicles requiring days to reach a full charge. Because of this charging time, Level 1 is best used with plug-in hybrids.

Level 2 is a more powerful AC charging solution that is commonly found both at home and at public charging stations. Level 2 chargers are ideal for charging all-electric vehicles overnight, but for home use, the equipment must be purchased and installed by a licensed electrician.

Level 3 is also known as “DC Fast Charging,” and usually can be the quickest charging solution. This is partially because it outputs DC electricity, which means the vehicle doesn’t need to convert incoming AC first. Level 3 is not practical for residential use and is only found at select public charging stations. Charge time will vary widely depending on outside temperature and other factors. DC Fast Charging is only available for bZ4X at this time.

How do I charge an all-electric vehicle?

The actual fill-up process is similar to that of a gasoline vehicle—simply insert the connector into the vehicle and charging will begin. In fact, most all-electric vehicles will also allow you to set a charging schedule to take advantage of varying electricity rates throughout the day.

This charging process can vary depending on equipment and location. Watch the how-to video on this page to learn more.

How do I monitor and manage my charging?

For Toyota vehicles with active Connected Services trials or subscriptions, the Toyota app is the best resource for home-charging management. It offers great tools and insights, including vehicle range, charging scheduling, tracking charging status and costs, and more.

The Toyota app can also be used to find public charging locations, as well as handle charging and payment at select network stations.

You can also monitor your charging—including battery level and estimated range—through the Multi-Information Display (MID) and central touchscreen in your vehicle.

It’s important to note that any estimated vehicle range calculations shown are based on previous usage patterns and may not accurately predict the vehicle range.

Where can I find out more information about Toyota’s electrified vehicles?

You can learn more about Toyota’s current and future electrified lineup by visiting toyota.com/electrified.

Charging Your Vehicle

Imagine never stopping at a gas station again, and instead, have an unlimited supply of fuel available at home or wherever you normally park. For many electric car drivers, this is a reality. All-electric cars never need gas, and for short trips, plug-in hybrids might use no gas.

Electric car charging is simple, cost-effective and convenient, particularly when you are plugged in at home—filling up your car even while you’re asleep. How long it takes to charge depends on the charging equipment and the size of the car’s battery and its available charging capacity.

Although electric car drivers primarily charge at home, workplace and public chargers are increasingly available in communities nationwide.

There are three convenient ways to charge your electric car.

I can charge at home any time I want, and it is quiet and drives beautifully!

It’s so quiet and quick. I wake up everyday with a full charge, ready to go.

No need to gas up weekly! After work I just come home and plug my car in.

See how easy it is to charge? Now compare electric cars and find out more about range.

Charging Basics

You can charge your electric car using standard 120 volt(V) home outlets (Level 1), 208-240V outlets like those used by your dryer (Level 2), or dedicated 480V public fast chargers (DC Fast Charging). The time it takes to charge using each of these three options depends on your drive and the size of the battery. Charging speed is also determined by the size of the vehicle’s on-board charger and the power lever of the charging equipment.

Level 1

Level 1 charging uses a standard 120-volt plug. Today, new electric cars come with portable charging equipment to allow you to plug in to any 120-volt outlet. Typically, the average daily commute of 40 miles can be easily replenished overnight with a Level 1 charger.

Level 2

In most cases Level 2 charging requires charging equipment to be purchased and installed. The typical Level 2 charger can replenish the same 40 mile average daily commute in less than 2 hours.

DC Fast Charging

DC fast chargers can provide 10 to 20 miles of range per minute.

DC Fast Charging is for public charging stations only and not for home use.

Most fully electric cars are equipped for DC Fast Charging today, but always be aware of your car’s charging connector before you try to plug in. You will either have a Tesla connector that can be used at a Tesla Supercharger, an SAE Combo connector or a Chademo connector.

Want to learn more on Fast Charging?

Check out this Quick Guide to Fast Charging by ChargePoint.

Level 1 and Level 2 Charging Options

Level 1: Electric cars come standard with a 120-volt Level 1 portable charger. Yes, these chargers can be plugged into a simple household outlet, and don’t require any special installation. Pretty cool, right?

Level 2: Drivers can also pursue a higher-powered Level 2 unit for sale and installation in their home. Shop Level 2 chargers and learn about incentives using our Home Charging Advisor. Learn more about home charging with our FAQs.

Tesla’s electric cars come with a plug-in 120/240-volt Level 1/2 charger. These require a 240-volt outlet, which most owners need to have professionally installed.

In general, most electric car drivers want the assurance and convenience of a quicker charge and eventually install the 240-volt, Level 2 charging ability in their home.

Home Charging Advisor

Find chargers and apply for incentives for charging your EV at home.

See how easy it is to charge? Now compare electric cars and find out more about range.

Workplace Charging

If charging at home is not an option or if you need to “top off” during the day for an extra errand, workplace charging is another convenient location to charge your car. Many employers are installing charging for their employees, so check with your company to see if this is an option for you.

If your employer has not implemented workplace charging yet, you can advocate that workplace charging is a good move. You can also provide them resources to help them consider the benefits.

Public Charging

Never fear! There are so many great charging station locators and mobile apps that help you find public charging stations when and where you need it. You can now expect public charging stations in public parking lots at the mall, the grocery store, movie theaters, community centers, arenas, hotels and airports.

Many are free or are offered at affordable prices, usually much less than the cost of gasoline.

You can search by charging speed and even by the station location you are interested, if it is available or currently in use.

Be sure to check with the car manufacturer and electric car driving manual for charging options that are right for your electric car. You may also need a subscription to charge with some of these networks, so plan ahead and do your research before going on that long road trip.

If you are a city or county looking to install public chargers in your area, check out the permitting video and resources to learn more about how you can increase charging in your area.

Electric Vehicle Charging Overview

Imagine never having to stop at a gas station again – and instead, having an unlimited supply of fuel available at home or wherever you normally park. For many electric vehicle (EV) drivers, this is a reality. Battery electric vehicles never need gas, and for short trips, plug–in hybrids might use no gas.

EV charging is simple, cost–effective, clean and convenient, particularly when you are plugged in at home – filling up your car, even while you’re asleep.

There are three categories of electric vehicle (EV) charging: Level 1, Level 2 and DC fast charging. Levels 1 and 2 charging use a universal connector that can be plugged into any EV. DC fast charging uses three different connector systems called CHAdeMO, CCS Combo and Tesla Supercharger.

Although EV drivers primarily charge at home, workplace and public chargers are increasingly available in communities nationwide. Use our EV Charging Station Map to find nearby charging stations.

Level 1 Charging

Level 1 is the slowest method of charging but is sufficient for drivers who charge overnight and travel 30–40 miles per day. Charging cables usually come with a vehicle and plug into a standard 120–volt AC outlet with no equipment installation required. Level 1 charging works well for charging at home, work or anywhere a standard outlet is available – and when you have sufficient time to charge.

Level 1 charging uses a standard J1772 or Tesla connector that can plug into any EV, either directly, or through an adapter.

Level 1 charging adds about 3.5 – 6.5 miles of driving range per hour of charging time.

Level 2 Charging

Level 2 charging is considerably faster, but requires installing a charging station, also known as electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE). EVSE requires a dedicated 240–volt or 208–volt electrical circuit, similar to what is required for a clothes dryer or electric range. Level 2 is found at many public and workplace charging stations, but also in many homes. It uses the same standard connector as Level 1 charging, meaning any EV can plug in at any Level 2 charger.

Level 2 charging uses a standard J1772 or Tesla connector that can plug into any EV, either directly, or through an adapter.

Depending on battery type, charger configuration and circuit capacity, Level 2 charging adds about 14 – 35 miles of range per hour of charging time.

DC Fast Charging

DC fast charging, also called quick charging or supercharging, provides the fastest available fill–up. It requires a 480–volt connection, making DC fast charging unsuitable for home use, and not every EV model is equipped for it. Stations offering DC fast charging are found in shopping centers and often along major travel corridors, allowing EV drivers to charge up quickly and take longer trips.

DC fast charging uses CHAdeMO, CCS or Tesla connector systems. Check with your vehicle manufacturer to determine if your car has fast charging capability and what connector systems are compatible with your EV.

Depending on battery type, charger configuration and circuit capacity, DC fast charging can add up to 100 miles of range in about 30 minutes of charging time.

Electric Vehicle Charging Costs

Home Charging CostsThe cost to charge your electric vehicle depends on your vehicle’s battery size and the price of electricity where you live. Most utilities offer time–of–use (TOU) rates that greatly reduce costs associated with charging a vehicle at home by charging during off–peak hours. Contact your utility to find out more. 1

While electricity costs vary greatly, the average cost of electricity in California is about 16.58¢ per kilowatt hour (kWh). 2 At this price point, charging a 40–kWh battery with a 150–mile range would cost about 4.42¢ per mile (or about 6.63 to fully charge). Meanwhile, fueling a 25–mpg gas vehicle at California’s average gas price of 3.11 per gallon 3 would cost about 12.44¢ per mile (or about 18.66 for enough gas to drive approximately 150 miles).

Home charging costs can be offset by hosting your charger on a home charging sharing network. EV drivers can earn money by sharing their home chargers or connect with other hosts to find convenient charging on the go. For more information about how you can earn money by sharing your home charger, please see these popular sharing networks:

Public Charging CostsWhile charging at home is generally preferred, many people also charge their EV at public charging stations. These stations can be free, pay–as–you–go or subscription-based, and are set by networks or property owners. Some vehicle manufacturers, such as Hyundai, Nissan and Tesla also provide complimentary public charging.

One popular public charging network charges members 1.50 per hour to charge on Level 2, and 26¢ per minute for DC fast charging in California. 4 At these rates, charging a 40–kWh battery with a 150–mile range would cost about 8¢ per mile on Level 2, and 9¢ per mile for DC fast charging.

For more information about public charging networks, here are some popular options available in California:

1 A list of utility providers is at https://www.energy.ca.gov/almanac/electricity_data/utilities.html2 https://www.eia.gov/electricity/state3 https://www.energy.gov/articles/egallon-how-much-cheaper-it-drive-electricity4 https://www.evgo.com/charging-plans/

Charging Station Rebates

Rebates for Residential Level 2 Charging StationsMany California utility providers and air districts offer rebates to make home Level 2 charging stations more affordable. Some of the rebates also help to offset the cost of installing the charging station at your home if additional electrical work is required. Find available rebates where you live.

Rebates for Commercial EV Charging StationsProperty owners can take advantage of rebates for installing commercial charging stations for public use. EV charging is a desired amenity for many California drivers and can attract more traffic to your business, improve tenant or employee satisfaction and generate a new revenue stream (fees for charging). Following are incentives that decrease the cost of charger purchases and installation. Visit the websites for more information on program eligibility requirements and funding availability.

Utility Incentives

Air District Incentives

The EV Charging Grid Needs Work, Lots of Work

Most charging stations have non-working plugs and complex payment systems.

By Mark Vaughn Published: Feb 22, 2023

  • Studies by JD Power and Deloitte confirm what many electric-vehicle drivers already know: The EV charging system in America is woefully inadequate, clunky, and just plain doesn’t work.
  • With the numbers of EVs coming onto the market increasing every model year, something has to be done. The question is, what?
  • Standards for payment is one way the Dept. of Transportation could help.

Complaining about the EV charging network today is like standing at Kitty Hawk watching the Wright Brothers glide past and yelling, “What the heck, man? I got a 5 o’clock flight to LAX I gotta be on! What is taking you morons so LONG?”

Yes, there is technically a charging network for electric cars in place in this country and, yes, you can plug into it—some of it, anyway, sometimes. But it’s a long way from being practical and a lot of it isn’t even useable.

At least that’s based on my own firsthand anecdotal experiences and the whinings and web postings of EV-savvy friends. The EV charging network in America is not exactly in its infancy, but it’s not yet in its adolescence, either. At least anecdotally speaking.

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“Charging an EV today at public stations is a lot like the wild, wild west—anything could happen,” said friend and colleague Richard Truett of Automotive News. “Or, more frequently, nothing could happen.”

Another friend, president, and chief analyst at Auto Pacific Ed Kim, drove a “wonderful” Genesis G80 EV from Southern California to Las Vegas recently. While the car performed flawlessly, the charging network did not.

“I plugged in at my local EVgo Network 350-kW charger (which should allow the G80 to charge to 80% in 22 minutes) and went for a 50-minute run, expecting to find the car fully charged upon my return. Came back to find it had a ‘connection error’ at 18% so basically, it wasn’t charging for nearly the entire time I was gone on my run. This is one of countless times I have had problems with public DC fast-chargers.”

My own experiences on long-distance road trips that required DC fast-charging have been equally frustrating. The vast majority of my attempts at DC fast-charging have resulted in frustration, and almost half of them have yielded no charge at all.

Let me share an example: I had a Lucid Air recently—surely the pinnacle of technology in an EV for the current time. The Lucid Air can go as much as 516 miles on a charge. But I wanted to plug it in anyway. So I searched “CCS charger” on my phone and was directed to a Loop Level 3 DC charger in Manhattan Beach. I parked and started following the limited directions on the charger. Nothing worked.

I tried every different configuration I could think of, based on my interpretation of the hieroglyphics on the charging pedestal. Nothing. There was no 800 number to call, at least not listed. There was a QR code, which I scanned. That lead to a web page encouraging me to buy a Loop charger.

Eventually I was directed to download an app—a favorite requirement of most EV fast-chargers—where I found a phone number. I called, and after a long wait, spoke with a gentleman whom, quite frankly, I could not easily understand. Eventually he claimed he fixed the problem and said the unit was charging my car. Or would soon be charging my car as soon as he “reset it.”

He sent me on my way to meet friends for dinner. But 15 minutes later I got a call from another Loop rep—a very excited, ridiculously friendly voice who instructed me to return to my car, whereupon I found that it was not charging. But this new voice did something on his end and voila, it was charging! At almost a half a buck per kWh.

The above scenario is not unique to that supplier. Something like it has happened to me most of the time at most chargers. The problem is rampant capitalism—the wild west. There are many, many different companies setting up charging stations all across the country, and none of them talk to each other. Most EV drivers would like to just pull up, plug in, and pay by credit card the way you can pay for everything from gasoline to tunafish salad.

Lucid Does Not Have a Charging Network of its Own

But almost all charging companies want you to download their app, perhaps the better to have you in their permanent clutches as a lifetime customer. Problem is, you never know where you’re going to drive on any given day, so you never know which charging network will present itself at whichever outlet you pull off the freeway. My phone is full of charging apps.

Okay, so that’s anecdotal whining. Scientifically speaking, it’s also somewhere between a frustrating experience and a nightmare.

“The growth of electric-vehicle sales during the past year has been remarkable but has added stress to an already beleaguered public vehicle charging infrastructure,” read the key findings in the second annual JD Power US Electric Vehicle Experience (EVX) Public Charging Study, released in 2022. “In this growth spurt, owners in high EV volume markets like California, Texas, and Washington, for instance, are finding the charging infrastructure inadequate and plagued with non-functioning stations.”

See? I’m not crazy. And the situation may be getting worse.

“Despite (the fact) that more public charging stations are in operation than ever before, customer satisfaction with public Level 2 charging declined from last year, dropping to 633 (on a 1000-point scale) from 643 in 2021, while satisfaction with the speedier DC (direct current) fast-charger segment remains flat at 674,” the study found. “This lack of progress points to the need for improvement as EVs gain wider consumer acceptance because the shortage of public charging availability is the number one reason vehicle shoppers reject EVs.”

Among users who were able to connect, Tesla owners were the happiest, according to JD Power, with the Tesla Supercharger network the most satisfying of all Level 3 DC fast-chargers, scoring 739 points out of 1000. Tesla also led the Level 2 charging networks with a 680 score.

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While you need public charging for road trips, the 2023 Global Automotive Consumer Study by Deloitte found that 77% of US EV buyers planned to avoid the hassle and simply charge at home. But when they were on the road, 56% of American EV drivers preferred to pay by credit card, with just 25% preferring to pay using a smartphone app.

Currently there are almost 150,000 public chargers across the country, grouped into over 50,000 public charging stations. Almost a third of them are in California, where most of the electric cars park. If you include plug-in hybrids in the tally, there are somewhere around 2.5 million electrified vehicles in the US and rising. With almost every carmaker in the world well on its way to total electrification, the charging network is in dire need of improvement.

What’s the answer? How about if the US Dept. of Transportation makes some kind of universally acceptable payment—perhaps the credit cards already in every wallet in America? Also, increased competition will lower the price of electricity. Anecdotally speaking, I seem to see 0.48 cents per kWh at DC fast-charging stations I visit here in LA. That is surely driving owners to charge at home where costs are lower. But for the most part, federal oversight could force the charging network in America to improve with some simple requirements that will make charging—and paying for it—more easily accessible to all.

When charging your EV at DC fast-chargers, how much are you paying per kWh, and where? Please comment below.

Mark Vaughn grew up in a Ford family and spent many hours holding a trouble light over a straight-six miraculously fed by a single-barrel carburetor while his father cursed Ford, all its products and everyone who ever worked there. This was his introduction to objective automotive criticism. He started writing for City News Service in Los Angeles, then moved to Europe and became editor of a car magazine called, creatively, Auto. He decided Auto should cover Formula 1, sports prototypes and touring cars—no one stopped him! From there he interviewed with Autoweek at the 1989 Frankfurt motor show and has been with us ever since.

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