Ccs home charger. Ccs home charger

Guide On How To Charge Your Electric Car With Charging Stations

Electric cars (EVs) and plug-in hybrid vehicles are relatively new on the market and the fact that they use electricity to propel themselves means a new infrastructure has been put into place, one which few are familiar with. This is why we have created this useful guide to explain and clarify the different charging solutions used to charge an electric car.

In this EV charging guide, you’ll learn more about the 3 places where it’s possible to charge, the 3 different levels of charging available in North America, fast charging with superchargers, charging times, and connectors. You’ll also discover an essential tool for public charging, and useful links to answer all of your questions.

Before we get into those concepts, it is good to know the various terms used for charging stations. They usually all refer to the same thing.

  • Charging station
  • Charging outlet
  • Charging plug
  • Charging port
  • Charger
  • EVSE (Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment)
home, charger

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Electric Car Home Chargers

Charging an electric car or plug-in hybrid is mainly done at home.Home charging accounts actually for 80% of all charging done by EV drivers. This is why it’s important to understand the solutions available, along with the pros of each.

Home Charging Solutions: Level 1 Level 2

There are two types of home charging: level 1 charging and level 2 charging.

  • Level 1 charging happens when you charge an electric vehicle (EV) using the charger included with the car. These chargers can be plugged with one end into any standard 120V outlet, with the other end being plugged directly into the car. It can charge 200 kilometers (124 miles) in 20 hours.
  • Level 2 chargers are sold separately from the car, although they’re often purchased at the same time. These chargers require a slightly more complicated setup, as they are plugged into a 240V outlet which allows charging 3 to 7 times faster depending on the electric car and the charger. All of these chargers have an SAE J1772 connector and are available for online purchase in Canada and the USA. They usually have to be installed by an electrician. You can learn more about level 2 charging stations in this guide.

For every electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid, the use of a level 2 home charging station is recommended to help you charge faster and enjoy your EV’s full potential. Provincial and municipal incentives are available in some regions to help with purchase and installation costs. You can also check the following websites for more information.

  • Quebec incentives for electric car home chargers
  • British Columbia incentives for electric car home chargers (the program is temporarily suspended)
  • For the United States, we suggest you check your government website.

The pros of home charging

To enjoy all the benefits of charging at home, you need to use a level 2 home charger.

A fully charged battery in a few hours

A level 2 charger allows you to charge your electric car 5 to 7 times faster for a full-electric car or up to 3 times faster for a plug-in hybrid compared to a level 1 charger. This means you’ll be able to maximize the use of your EV and reduce stops to charge at public charging stations.

It takes around four hours to fully charge a 30-kWh battery car (standard battery for an electric car), which allows you to make the most out of driving your EV, especially when you have a limited time to charge.

Start Your Day Fully Charged

Home charging is normally done on evenings and at night. Just connect your charger to your electric car when you come home from work, and you’ll be sure to have a fully charged battery the next morning. Most of the time, an EV’s range is enough for all your daily travel, meaning you won’t have to stop at public chargers for charging. At home, your electric car charges while you eat, play with the kids, watch TV, and sleep!

Save Big on Charging Costs

  • In Quebec, it is about 30% less expensive to charge at home than at a public charger and 6 times less expensive to drive 100 km (62 miles) on electricity than on gas.
  • In Ontario, it is roughly 65% less expensive to charge at home than at a public charger and 5 times less expensive to drive 100 km (62 miles) on electricity than on gas.
  • In British Columbia, it is roughly 30% cheaper to charge at home than at a public charger and 5 times less expensive to drive 100 km (62 miles) on electricity than on gas.
  • In the United States, it all depends on the price of electricity and gas. You have to compare the consumption of electricity in kWh/100 miles of the EV multiplied by the cost of the kWh vs. the consumption of gallons/100 miles of the gas car multiplied by the price of a gallon of gas. That way, you will be able to quickly know how much you could save on your travel costs.

Electric Car Public Charging Stations

Public charging allows EV drivers to charge their electric cars on the road when they need to travel longer distances than allowed by their EV’s autonomy. These public chargers are often located near restaurants, shopping centers, parking spots, and such public spaces.

To locate them easily, we suggest you use ChargeHub’s charging stations map that is available on iOS, Android, and web browsers. The map lets you easily find every public charger in North America. You can also see most chargers’ status in real time, make itineraries, and more. We’ll be using our map in this guide to explain how the public charging works.

There are three main things to know about public charging: the 3 different levels of charging, the difference between connectors and the charging networks.

Charging Station Connectors

home, charger

Charging Station Networks

In This Section

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Charger Types and Speeds

EVs can be charged using electric vehicle service equipment (EVSE) operating at different charging speeds.

Level 1

Level 1 equipment provides charging through a common residential 120-volt (120V) AC outlet. Level 1 chargers can take 40-50 hours to charge a BEV to 80 percent from empty and 5-6 hours for a PHEV.

Level 2

Level 2 equipment offers higher-rate AC charging through 240V (in residential applications) or 208V (in commercial applications) electrical service, and is common for home, workplace, and public charging. Level 2 chargers can charge a BEV to 80 percent from empty in 4-10 hours and a PHEV in 1-2 hours.

Direct Current Fast Charging (DCFC)

Direct current fast charging (DCFC) equipment offers Rapid charging along heavy-traffic corridors at installed stations. DCFC equipment can charge a BEV to 80 percent in just 20 minutes to 1 hour. Most PHEVs currently on the market do not work with fast chargers.

Level 2 and DCFC equipment has been deployed at various public locations including, for example, at grocery stores, theaters, or coffee shops. When selecting a charger type, consider its voltages, resulting charging and vehicle dwell times, and estimated up-front and ongoing costs.

The figure below shows typical Level 2 and DCFC charging stations 1.

EV Charging Minimum Standards Rule

FHWA, with support from the Joint Office of Energy Transportation, unveiled new national standards for federally funded EV chargers in February 2023. These new standards aim to ensure that charging is a predictable and reliable experience for EV drivers. This includes ensuring that drivers can easily find a charger, do not need multiple apps and/or accounts to charge, chargers work when drivers need them to, and are designed to be compatible in the future with forward-looking charging capabilities.

The rule establishes minimum technical standards for charging stations, including required number of charging ports, connector types, power level, availability, payment methods, uptime/reliability, EV charger infrastructure network connectivity, and interoperability, among other standards and requirements.

Overview of EV Chargers

The below table summarizes the typical power output, charging time, and locations for PHEVs and BEVs for the different charger types. For more information on the power requirements of different chargers, see the Utility Planning section of the toolkit.

1 Note that charging speed is affected by many factors, including the charger manufacturer, condition, and age; air temperature; vehicle battery capacity; and vehicle age and condition.

2 Different vehicles have different charge ports. For DCFC, the Combined Charging System (CCS) connector is based on an open international standard and is common on vehicles manufactured in North America and Europe; the CHArge de Move (CHAdeMO) connector is most common for Japanese manufactured vehicles. Tesla vehicles have a unique connector that works for all charging speeds, including at Tesla’s “Supercharger” DCFC stations, while non-Tesla vehicles require adapters at these stations.

3 AC = alternating current; DC = direct current.

4 Assuming an 8-kWh battery; most plug-in hybrids do not work with fast chargers.

6 To 80 percent charge. Charging speed slows as the battery gets closer to full to prevent damage to the battery. Therefore, it is more cost- and time-efficient for EV drivers to use direct current (DC) fast charging until the battery reaches 80 percent, and then continue on their trip. It can take about as long to charge the last 10 percent of an EV battery as the first 90 percent.

Get up to speed with EV charging.

Boost your all-electric knowledge with videos that simplify electricity and charging concepts.

Find out what you need to know about the charging process—whether in the convenience of home or on the go.

Set up your at-home charging station.

Prius Prime LE shown in Blue Magnetism

How to install a Level 2 charger.

You just need a licensed electrician to install it. Here are some equipment and installation options:

ChargePoint® Home Flex can charge your EV in the comfort of your own garage.

Need help finding an electrician? Qmerit can connect you with a licensed electrician near you.

Charging has gone public.

Juice up on the go by tapping into a network of public charging stations.

bZ4X Limited shown in Heavy Metal with Black roof

Finding a station has never been easier.

With currently over 30,000 public stations supporting Level 2 and DC Fast Charging, charging on the go is more convenient than ever. Just pull up, plug in, and charge up. And Toyota is working with ChargePoint and EVgo to help make tapping into their networks even easier.

Customers who purchase or lease a new 2023 Toyota bZ4X will get one year of unlimited complimentary charging at all EVgo-owned and operated public charging stations nationwide.

Charging Stations In Your Area

Charger Types

  • Level 2 Charger Supports: bZ4X, RAV4 Prime, Prius Prime
  • Level 3 Charger Supports: bZ4X

Charging Networks

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  • ChargePoint
  • EVgo

Oops.

We’re having trouble loading your map. Apologies for any inconvenience.

Toyota does not own or operate the stations and is not responsible for their availability or performance. Click on station name for address.

0% of charging energy matched with renewable energy.

Clean Assist allows eligible All-Electric Vehicle owners nationwide and Plug-In Hybrid Vehicle owners in California to offset their vehicle charging with 100% renewable energy—no matter where the vehicles are plugged in. And there’s no cost to participate in the program.

How it Works

Owners of eligible vehicles can opt into the Toyota Clean Assist program through the Toyota App. Active Remote Connect Trial or Subscription required.

The Toyota App then tracks the amount of the electricity used during charging and calculates the net emissions produced by charging.

Toyota then generates, or buys, an equivalent amount of Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs), ensuring that all charging activity is matched with zero-carbon electricity.

Vehicle Benefits

Feel the smooth acceleration, instant torque delivery and quiet drive—all advantages of the electric motor over an internal combustion engine.

Reducing CO2 emissions by going fully electric is one way we can lessen our impact on the environment.

All-Electric and Plug-In Hybrid vehicles can bring about potential state incentives. Preliminary expectations include a lower cost of ownership, including overall service and maintenance costs.

FAQs

What are the different types of electrified vehicles?

Electrified vehicles come in four flavors: hybrid, plug-in hybrid, fuel cell, and all-electric (referred to as Battery EVs, BEVs, or simply EVs).

Toyota offers a wide range of hybrids and plug-in hybrids, as well as the fuel cell Mirai in California, and the all-electric bZ4X. Discover this growing lineup at toyota.com/electrified.

Why drive an all-electric vehicle?

Three words: convenience, fun and savings.

All-electric vehicles can be conveniently charged at home, overnight and on-demand, as well as at public charging stations when out and about. No more trips to the gas station needed.

They’re also fun to drive, thanks to the immediate torque response from the electric motors, as well as the smooth acceleration and quiet cabin.

Drivers won’t just save money by avoiding the gas pump, either—they may also be able to enjoy state incentives, as well as the potential long-term maintenance savings typical of an all-electric powertrain.

And as icing on the cake, driving an all-electric vehicle can also help the environment by reducing CO2 emissions.

What is the all-electric vehicle driving experience like?

Thanks to the use of electric motors instead of internal combustion engines, all-electric vehicles provide smooth acceleration, immediate torque response and a surprisingly quiet ride experience.

How far will an all-electric vehicle go?

The driving range of an all-electric vehicle will vary depending on how/where you drive, charging habits, accessory use, outside temperature and other factors. Battery capacity also decreases with time and use, which will reduce range.

What can impact driving range?

All-electric driving range may decrease significantly depending on speed, outside temperature, accessory use, how/where you drive, charging habits, and other factors. Battery capacity also decreases with time and use which will reduce range.

Where can I charge an all-electric vehicle?

All-electric vehicles can be charged at home with Level 1 or Level 2 charging solutions, or at public charging stations with Level 2 and Level 3.

Many public charging networks, like ChargePoint and EVgo, further simplify the charging process by providing app-based charger access and payment.

What are the different charging levels?

There are three different all-electric vehicle charging levels.

Level 1 is the basic charging solution. Primarily for home use, Level 1 charging cables plug directly into a standard wall outlet. They are usually included with the vehicle and are totally portable, so they can go where you and your vehicle go. This is the slowest option, however, with all-electric vehicles requiring days to reach a full charge. Because of this charging time, Level 1 is best used with plug-in hybrids.

Level 2 is a more powerful AC charging solution that is commonly found both at home and at public charging stations. Level 2 chargers are ideal for charging all-electric vehicles overnight, but for home use, the equipment must be purchased and installed by a licensed electrician.

Level 3 is also known as “DC Fast Charging,” and usually can be the quickest charging solution. This is partially because it outputs DC electricity, which means the vehicle doesn’t need to convert incoming AC first. Level 3 is not practical for residential use and is only found at select public charging stations. Charge time will vary widely depending on outside temperature and other factors. DC Fast Charging is only available for bZ4X at this time.

How do I charge an all-electric vehicle?

The actual fill-up process is similar to that of a gasoline vehicle—simply insert the connector into the vehicle and charging will begin. In fact, most all-electric vehicles will also allow you to set a charging schedule to take advantage of varying electricity rates throughout the day.

This charging process can vary depending on equipment and location. Watch the how-to video on this page to learn more.

How do I monitor and manage my charging?

For Toyota vehicles with active Connected Services trials or subscriptions, the Toyota app is the best resource for home-charging management. It offers great tools and insights, including vehicle range, charging scheduling, tracking charging status and costs, and more.

The Toyota app can also be used to find public charging locations, as well as handle charging and payment at select network stations.

You can also monitor your charging—including battery level and estimated range—through the Multi-Information Display (MID) and central touchscreen in your vehicle.

It’s important to note that any estimated vehicle range calculations shown are based on previous usage patterns and may not accurately predict the vehicle range.

Where can I find out more information about Toyota’s electrified vehicles?

You can learn more about Toyota’s current and future electrified lineup by visiting toyota.com/electrified.

Meet Quasar 2

Quasar 2 is the next-generation bi-directional DC charger that enables your car to power your home, even during a power outage. Pull energy from your car and send it back to the grid or use it to power your home. When the power goes out, rest assured you and your family will stay safe as Quasar 2 will keep your home powered for over 3 days.

Based on typical energy usage.

Powerful

11.5kW for faster EV charging and discharging.

Compact

An updated lightweight design for easy installation that fits your life.

Versatile

Use your EV to power your home, daily or during a power outage.

Introducing Blackout Mode

Use your EV battery to power your home in the event of a power outage, even those caused by natural disasters. Quasar 2 will seamlessly transition your home to vehicle energy when the power goes out.

Experience the power of the Quasar charging family

Save on home energy costs with vehicle-to-home (V2H) functionality: Charge your vehicle during off-peak hours and then use that energy to power your home during peak hours. Reducing your grid dependency lowers energy costs.

Access discounts with vehicle-to-grid (V2G) functionality: Send energy from your vehicle back to the grid to get discounts on your monthly energy bill from participating utility partners. Get more energy when you need it: At moments when your home is reaching peak energy demand, pull energy from the vehicle to cover any extra energy needs and avoid blackouts or surprise fees. Solar charging compatible: Charge your EV using solar energy. Avoid grid energy and make the most of your solar installation, while charging in the most sustainable way.

Save on home energy costs with vehicle-to-home (V2H) functionality: Charge your vehicle during off-peak hours and then use that energy to power your home during peak hours. Reducing your grid dependency lowers energy costs. Access discounts with vehicle-to-grid (V2G) functionality: Send energy from your vehicle back to the grid to get discounts on your monthly energy bill from participating utility partners. Get more energy when you need it: At moments when your home is reaching peak energy demand, pull energy from the vehicle to cover any extra energy needs and avoid blackouts or surprise fees. Access discounts with vehicle-to-grid (V2G) functionality: Send energy from your vehicle back to the grid to get discounts on your monthly energy bill from participating utility partners. Access discounts with vehicle-to-grid (V2G) functionality: Send energy from your vehicle back to the grid to get discounts on your monthly energy bill from participating utility partners. Access discounts with vehicle-to-grid (V2G) functionality: Send energy from your vehicle back to the grid to get discounts on your monthly energy bill from participating utility partners. Solar charging compatible: Charge your EV using solar energy. Avoid grid energy and make the most of your solar installation, while charging in the most sustainable way. Access discounts with vehicle-to-grid (V2G) functionality: Send energy from your vehicle back to the grid to get discounts on your monthly energy bill from participating utility partners.

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