3 Useful tips to make your ATV battery last longer. Atv not charging battery

useful tips to make your ATV battery last longer!

It happened to all us! Facing a dead battery when trying to start our ATV or UTV! Have you ever wonder why? Maybe there is a reason for it! And what if I tell you there are many ways available to you to have your ATV battery last longer.

KEEP YOUR BATTERY CLEAN

First thing first! Ensure your terminals are clean and in good conditions! Too often you see corroded terminals full of build up! Having a clean battery is the first step in making it last longer. A corroded battery can keep your ATV from starting. No matter what kind of battery you have, your terminals can become corroded and poor conductors of electricity.

KEEP YOUR BATTERY FULLY CHARGED

What if I tell you there’s a simple way to ensure your ATV starts even after weeks of no use! How is that possible? KEEP YOUR BATTERY FULLY CHARGED! Yes. This will not only make it last longer but also let you use your vehicle whenever you need it without having to boost it or loosing time dealing with a dead battery!

Here’s how you do it. You will need a YUASA Automatic Battery Charger/Maintainer. This charger will Charge and maintain your battery with a 3 Stage Charge Cycle reaching a 14.4 volt peak, then automatically switches to maintenance mode. It is designed to prevent overcharging and includes quick connect adapter and alligator clips. Simply fix the cable mounted with a quick connect to your battery. Always leave them fixed to your ATV. Connect them quickly to the charger after every ride! This will ensure your battery stay fully charged.

KEEP IT HOT

Another common reason why batteries fall to start is cold. Some of us have to deal with colder months during the year. Not all of us have the chance to store the ATV in a heated garage! The Kimpex Battery heater will preheat your battery to help starting during extremely cold weather. Having your battery heated will give that extra boost your engine needs to start. A cold battery has less power and could fell to prevent the desired energy to start an engine. Mix the Battery heater with an automatic charger in colder days and keep your battery in life and ready to use!

Bonus

When leaving for a long ride, always make you have a booster pack or booster cable with you! Better more prepared then not enough!

All batteries are not made equal: Learn more

× Polaris Voltage Regulator Problems and how to Fix it!

Polaris is a pioneer when it comes to off-road vehicles such as ATVs and UTVs. They have a massive client base, and they do have a successful lineup to back that up. Even with all this success, you cannot overlook the fact that the company has been plagued by Polaris Voltage Regulator problems for a long time.

Polaris RZR, Ranger, and Sportsman have problems with voltage regulators that cause low voltage and battery charging issues. Some Polaris RZR and Sportsman’s voltage regulators are reported to overheat and melt wires.

Due to this issue, some models are more consistently affected than others. Let us look at some of the problems that you could encounter with the voltage regulator on your Polaris. Furthermore, at the end of this, you will know how to perform required repairs and their costs.

Join our free group and ask your question there. We promise you, you’ll get an answer from one of our team members or group members. Join the group here!

Electronics Not Working Due to Failed Voltage Regulator – Polaris Snowmobile and Ranger

When the voltage regulator goes bad on your Polaris snowmobile or Ranger, the electronics may not work. In many cases, this will mean that the ignition won’t start, the lights don’t turn on, and even the battery may not charge.

Here’s a Polaris community member explaining the issue:

“At the end of last season when I went to start the sled one morning, the lights and dash came on as usual but quickly shut off. The dash was completely blank and unresponsive and both the head and tail lights are very dimly lit. The hand and thumb warmers didn’t work either, but the sled ran fine!:dunno: Reverse didn’t work either.”

Polaris Snowmobile IQ 600 HO and Ranger XP 700 experience this problem.

A failed voltage regulator can take down many components with itself. Not only that, it may leave you stranded in the middle of the road. Hence, repairs can be costly and time-consuming, so it’s important to troubleshoot any problems as soon as they arise.

An aftermarket regulator will cost around 50 and will take about 15 minutes to replace.

Low Voltage Issue – Polaris Ranger, RZR, and Sportsman

Polaris voltage regulator issues can often be traced back to a low voltage issue. A large number of new machines come to factory with a low voltage issue, and it’s very difficult to troubleshoot.

Polaris XP 800, 900, and Sportsman X2 570 models have been experiencing low voltage due to voltage regulator problems.

Ideally, the battery needs DC 13.5v to charge. But the voltage output can sometimes drop down to 10 or even a single digit.

Sometimes, the engine doesn’t start and begins cranking. During the ride, the voltage keeps dropping until the vehicle dies down.

You don’t have any option except to replace the bad regulator. If the problem persists, the issue is probably with the stator or battery.

Overcharging Battery or Intermittent Charging – Polaris RZR, Ranger, and Sportsman

Overcharging will occur when the voltage regulator supplies more than required to the battery. Overcharging can shorten the battery life and eventually lead to a dead vehicle. At any rpm, you should never see a charge voltage of 18 or 19 volts.

Polaris XP 800, 900, and Sportsman X2 570 models have been reported with this problem.

If your machine exhibits intermittent charging – as it charges for a while then stops – it may indicate an overcharged battery or faulty voltage regulator.

If you’ve replaced the VR a couple of times and are facing this issue again, it’s probably the stator making them go bad.

Here’s how you can check the stator if it’s broken before you spend 100 to 150 on fixing the ECM:

Voltage Regulator Getting Extremely Hot – Polaris RZR

Some Polaris ATVs, such as RZR 900s, have voltage regulators that get extremely hot to touch. It can be due to a loose battery connection, worn-out terminals, or simply a bad voltage regulator.

How hot can a voltage regulator be? What’s the normal temperature?

When the cord on an electric space heater runs, it reaches over 100F – warm to the touch but not excessively hot.

The temperature of a cord on an electric space heater, image courtesy.

As long as you can touch the wire, you can continue using the current regulator. Just make sure that the connections are good and tight, especially at the battery and if anything is shorted to the ground. If you see any burnt-out terminals or connectors, it’s time to replace the regulator.

Voltage Regulator Getting Extremely Hot – Polaris Sportsman

Polaris Sportsman models (2008 Sportsman 500) have been known to experience melted voltage regulator wires.

Melted yellow wires of the regulator, image courtesy.

Here’s what a customer has to say in a forum community:

I noticed this the other day when something started smoking. I just got around to pulling off the cargo box to investigate. Where I had some auto conduit around the yellow wires had melted. Upon looking further. The plug itself had melted too. So now both plugs are melted. The male end coming from the wire harness will need to be replaced. I have searched and can’t find a replacement anywhere. Does anybody know of one?

Here’s what you can start with:

  • Do a resistance test on the stator
  • When running the motor at 3000 rpm, conduct a voltage test on the battery.
  • Check every connector if it’s clean and making contact.

Soldering the connections together and removing the plug may help. The plug is a poorly designed product. The wires should be 10 gages rather than 12.

If your regulator wires are melting, the only solution is to replace the VR and the harness.

You will need the “3 Position HD Waterproof Connector” for the voltage regulator. You may buy 2x or 3x as much as you need. It won’t hurt to have backups.

If you see any melted or scorched wires near your battery, it’s best to immediately replace your entire voltage regulator.

Bad Regulator Due to High Loads – Polaris Ranger

The voltage regulator will inevitably fail if you continually put high loads on the battery. If the charging circuit operates will run on all the time, something that it’s not intended to do.

Polaris Ranger 900 XP Deluxe displays this problem often.

The real issue is what current the VR (and alternator) is drawing to maintain the specified voltage, not how much the VR can maintain the voltage. The VR is only supposed to provide a limited amount of current when the load on the battery becomes too high.

If you’re running your machine at full throttle all the time, it’s likely that your VR isn’t up to par and needs to be replaced.

Bad Connections Between Battery and Regulator – Polaris Ranger, Dragon, and Snowmobile

Because of poor connections between the battery and the regulator, Polaris regulator rectifiers generally burn. If you’ve been living in moist weather and frequently travel through water, you are more susceptible to having corrosion build up in Polaris ATV connectors.

This leads to unneeded resistance, which creates heat and causes excess current overcoming the resistance.

People found this common in Polaris Ranger XP 700 and some Snowmobile IQ 700 vehicles.

The Polaris voltage regulator will not be able to drain excessive voltage adequately if corrosion forms on the ground connector, causing it to overheat and potentially causing a burnt regulator.

Other symptoms may include low voltage or frequent voltage fluctuations.

If you’re having this problem, be sure not to operate on the current VR system. If you do so, the likelihood of your ECU frying up is high.

Fill the connections with dielectric grease to exclude water and prevent corrosion, then wait to see if whatever problem you experienced happens again. If it does, the VR needs to be replaced.

How Long To Charge ATV Battery – A Complete Guide

No matter how big, strong, and capable your all-terrain vehicle’s battery might be, it still needs a recharge every once in a while. Now, the most popular questions online are “how long to charge ATV battery” and “how can I charge the battery on my own”. Well, that’s exactly why I decided to write this post – to guide you through the process of charging. This isn’t rocket science, but there are still some rules to follow.

Unless you do it properly, you can end up damaging the battery and even the entire powertrain (mostly, the engine). Yep, you heard it right. So, without further ado, let’s get right to it. We’ll start by learning the ideal charging time for ATV batteries and then talk about the actual charging process in more detail, including Smart chargers, voltmeters, and more.

Perfect Charging Times

The big question is – are there any ideal charging times for ATV batteries, or not? Here are the facts: a full charge usually takes between three to ten hours. This depends on the battery (how old it is, how well you take care of it) and the charger. If you’ve got a high-grade charger, it will need very little time to recharge the battery. Now, it’s important to understand that a “high-grade” unit isn’t the one that transmits a strong current.

It’s actually the other way around. Say, you’ve got a charger that puts out 2 amps. That device will fully recharge an ATV battery in less than four hours. In contrast, a 5-amp charger will get the job done in 9-10 hours. Some chargers have different operating modes. By switching to the float/drip mode, you can expect the battery to reach a full charge in 4.5-5 hours.

Safety Precautions

The most important thing to remember when dealing with ATV batteries is to make sure you’ve got the right device for charging. I’m talking about voltage, of course. Keep in mind that four-wheeler batteries are pretty fragile. So, if you were wondering – how to charge an ATV battery with car charger – here’s my answer. You shouldn’t really use a regular car charger to “fire up” an ATV battery.

The reason: it usually has a rather high power output (up to 10 amps, or more). That kind of charge will, most likely, cause a quad vehicle’s battery to overheat, which leads to permanent damage and maybe even a malfunction in the engine. Only consider using a car charger if it’s a customizable device that allows limiting the output. If that’s the case, put the threshold/limit at 2-3 amps, and give it a try.

How long do Batteries Last?

Again, this largely depends on the quality of the battery unit and your maintenance routine. If you want to know the average lifespan, it’s 3 to 4 years. There is little point in buying some of the more expensive batteries because their life expectancy won’t be significantly higher compared to the cheaper options. Some experts claim that the more you charge a battery, the less reliable and durable it becomes.

That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t charge it at all, of course. What I would recommend is to constantly check on the charge levels. There are actually pretty clear instructions for this: only consider charging the battery when its voltage drops below 12.4 volts. If it’s higher, there will be little use in “refilling” the charge. I also want to say that the quality of the charger affects the lifespan of the battery as well.

Charging an ATV Battery: Looking for the Right Device

Alright, so, by now, we’ve talked about the right charging times for quad batteries, learned how long the average battery lasts and familiarized ourselves with some safety precautions. We still have one “stop” to make. With the basics out of the way, let’s go ahead and learn how to charge ATV battery. The best way to do this is to invest in a decent-quality Smart charger. These are available for 70-80 US dollars and last for many years, if not decades.

The best thing about Smart chargers is that they are compatible with a long line of four-wheelers and have wires-connections for pretty much every single ATV battery on the market. Another big pro: most reasonably-priced Smart chargers have a built-in system that stops the charging process once the battery reaches a full charge. That prevents it from damaging the battery (yes, overly long charging times are known to cause overheating, among other things).

The less expensive chargers don’t have this feature, and you’ll have to turn them off manually.

Charging an ATV Battery: a Step-by-Step Guide

Don’t worry: there’s nothing hard about using a Smart charger. You will, however, need a screwdriver (or, at least, a wrench) to remove the plastic side panel and access the “insides” of your quad vehicle. In some cases, the seat will have to be removed as well. At this point, you’ve got a choice to make: either leave the battery where it is or remove it. I recommend taking it out completely.

That way, it will be much easier to disconnect it from the ATV. This is important: make sure every single wire is disconnected before charging the battery! Next, use the clamps provided with the charger to connect to the battery unit. The positive lead is colored red and should connect to the positive terminal of the ATV battery. The negative lead, in turn, is usually black and is used for grounding.

A clean, bare metallic surface will do just fine. I usually connect the negative to my all-terrain vehicle’s frame. The connectors should always be sparkly-clean – even the tiniest dust particles can cause some trouble. Plus, don’t forget to get a pair of protective gloves and eyewear. The acid inside of batteries is pretty toxic for the human skin.

useful, tips, make, your, battery

Once you’re done, disconnect the charger and give the battery a try. I always let it sit for at least a couple of hours before using a voltmeter to measure the charge. If the battery can’t hold the charge properly, chances are, you’re dealing with a dead unit that needs to be replaced.

Conclusion

Ok, that concludes my guide into the world of ATV batteries. If you don’t want to spend big bucks on a new battery or pay a mechanic to charge it, you need to at least know the basics of proper charging. As we learned today, all-terrain-vehicle batteries are pretty fragile and sensitive, which means they need chargers with a specific power output to work correctly. Once you get to know the basics, it will be much easier to do everything on your own.

It’s all about following the rules and using the right equipment and techniques for charging. And if you still have some questions left, don’t hesitate to reach out to me! Or, use the Комментарии и мнения владельцев section to share your thoughts, tips, and tricks for the less experienced readers. Take care of your ATV, and happy travels!

How To Charge An ATV Battery With A Car Charger? [Be A Pro Today]

How to charge an ATV battery with a car charger is a common question nowadays.

Mainly, newcomers, ATV enthusiasts, may find themselves in situations where they need to charge their ATV batteries but don’t have access to a dedicated ATV battery charger. In such instances, using a car charger can be a convenient and effective alternative.

To charge an ATV battery with a car charger, turn off both engines, detach the ATV battery terminals, and connect the car charger clamps (red to positive, black to negative). Plug in the charger, set the charging rate, and monitor until the battery is fully charged. Finally, disconnect the charger and reconnect the battery terminals.

In this comprehensive guide, we will walk you through a step-by-step process on how to safely and effectively charge your ATV battery using a car charger.

Steps To Charge An ATV Battery With a Car Charger:

Once you collect these, let’s move on to the steps.

Step 1: Safety Precautions

Before you begin, ensure that you are in a well-ventilated area, away from open flames or sparks. Put on safety goggles and gloves to protect yourself from potential hazards.

Step 2: Turn Off the ATV and Vehicle

Switch off the ATV’s engine and ensure that the ignition is in the “OFF” position. Also, turn off the engine of the vehicle providing the power for the car charger.

Step 3: Locate the ATV Battery

Refer to your ATV owner’s manual to find the battery location. In most cases, it is found under the seat or in a compartment near the engine. Remove any protective covers or panels to access the battery.

Step 4: Identify the Battery Terminals

Inspect the ATV battery to identify the positive and negative (-) terminals. They are typically marked with red and black colors or plus and minus (-) symbols.

Step 5: Connect the Jumper Cables

If you’re using jumper cables, connect the red clamp to the positive terminal of the vehicle’s battery and the other red clamp to the positive terminal of the ATV battery. Then, connect the black clamp to the negative terminal of the vehicle’s battery and the other black clamp to the negative terminal of the ATV battery.

If you’re using battery charger cables, connect the red clamp to the positive terminal of the ATV battery and the black clamp to the negative terminal.

Step 6: Connect the Car Charger

Plug the car charger into the vehicle’s 12-volt accessory outlet (cigarette lighter socket). Ensure that the car charger is compatible with the ATV battery’s voltage (usually 12 volts).

Step 7: Start the Vehicle’s Engine

Start the engine of the vehicle providing the power for the car charger. This will begin charging the ATV battery.

Step 8: Monitor the Charging Process

Keep an eye on the car charger’s indicator light or screen. Most chargers will have a display to show the charging progress. Do not leave the charger unattended during this process.

Step 9: Disconnect When Charged

Once the ATV battery is fully charged, turn off the vehicle’s engine. Carefully disconnect the jumper cables or battery charger cables in reverse order. First, remove the black clamp from the ATV battery’s negative terminal, then remove the black clamp from the vehicle’s battery. Finally, remove the red clamp from the ATV battery’s positive terminal, and then remove the red clamp from the vehicle’s battery.

Step 10: Reassemble and Test

Replace any protective covers or panels on the ATV and make sure all connections are secure. Start the ATV to ensure that the battery is functioning properly.

useful, tips, make, your, battery

Is It Logical To Charge An ATV Battery With A Car Battery?

It is possible to charge an ATV battery with a car battery, but it is not recommended. This is because car batteries have a much higher amperage than ATV batteries, which can cause damage or overcharge the smaller ATV battery.

Besides, car batteries are not designed for prolonged use as a charger, which can result in overheating and damage to the car’s electrical system. It is safer and more effective to use a dedicated ATV battery charger to charge your ATV battery.

How Long Does It Take To Charge An ATV Battery Using A Car Charger?

The charging time for an ATV battery using a car charger can vary depending on several factors such as the battery’s size, age, and the charging rate of the car charger.

As a general guideline, it can take between 1 to 8 hours to charge an ATV battery with a car charger, depending on the battery’s condition and the charging rate used.

Anyway, it’s important to note that you should never leave the battery charging unattended and regularly monitor the charging progress to prevent overcharging and overheating. Once the battery is fully charged, disconnect the charger and reconnect the battery terminals before using the ATV.

Can I Charge A Dead ATV Battery With A Car Charger?

Yes, it is possible to charge a dead ATV battery with a car charger. But it depends on the condition of the battery. If the battery is completely dead, it may take longer to charge and may require a higher charging rate than a partially discharged battery.

It’s important to ensure the battery’s voltage is not too low to avoid damaging the charger or the battery itself. In some cases, a severely discharged battery may require a specialized charger or may need to be replaced if it cannot be charged. Always refer to the manufacturer’s instructions for the ATV battery and the car charger before attempting to charge a dead battery.

How Can I Determine If My Car Charger Is Compatible With My ATV Battery?

To determine if your car charger is compatible with your ATV battery, you need to consider a few factors:

Check the connector type on both the car charger and the ATV battery to ensure that they are compatible. Some ATV batteries may have a unique connector type that requires a specific charger.

Check the charging time required for your ATV battery and ensure that the car charger can provide enough power to charge the battery within the required time frame.

How Can I Monitor The Charging Process To Ensure The Safety Of My ATV Battery And Charger?

To ensure the safety of your ATV battery and charger during the charging process, here are some steps you can take to monitor it:

  • Check the charger: Before you begin charging, inspect the charger for any visible signs of damage or wear. Make sure the cord is not frayed, and the prongs are not bent or damaged.
  • Monitor the charging process: Keep an eye on the charging process and make sure the charger is functioning correctly. Check the battery periodically to see if it is getting too hot or if the charger is making unusual noises.
  • Use a Smart charger: Consider using a Smart charger that has built-in safety features. These chargers can monitor the battery’s charge level and automatically adjust the charging rate to prevent overcharging or overheating.
  • Use a voltage meter: You can use a voltage meter to monitor the battery’s voltage during the charging process. This can help you identify any potential issues, such as overcharging or undercharging.
  • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions: Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for charging your ATV battery. This will help ensure that you are using the charger correctly and prevent any damage to your battery or charger.
  • Disconnect the charger when charging is complete: Once the battery is fully charged, disconnect the charger from the battery and the power source. Leaving the charger connected can overcharge the battery, leading to damage or even a fire.

What Are The Signs Of A Fully Charged ATV Battery When Using A Car Charger?

  • The battery feels cool to the touch: A fully charged battery should not feel warm or hot to the touch. If the battery feels cool, it may be an indication that it has reached a full charge.
  • The charger has been connected for the recommended time: Refer to the manufacturer’s instructions for the recommended charging time for your ATV battery. If you have followed the recommended charging time and disconnected the charger, your battery may be fully charged.
  • The voltage level is stable: You can use a multimeter or a voltage meter to measure the battery’s voltage level during charging. When the battery is fully charged, the voltage level should be stable and not fluctuate.
  • The battery holds a charge: After disconnecting the charger, try starting your ATV. If the battery holds a charge and the engine starts easily, it may be an indication that the battery is fully charged.

How Do I Maintain My ATV Battery’s Health When Using A Car Charger For Charging?

  • Charge the battery in a well-ventilated area: When charging your battery, make sure you are in a well-ventilated area. Batteries release gasses during charging, and if the area is not well-ventilated, it can lead to a buildup of potentially explosive gasses.
  • Keep the battery clean: Dirt and grime on the battery can cause it to discharge more quickly. Clean the battery terminals regularly with a wire brush and a solution of baking soda and water to remove any buildup.
  • Store the battery properly: If you’re storing your ATV for an extended period, remove the battery and store it in a cool, dry place. Charge the battery fully before storing it and check it periodically to ensure that it retains its charge.

What Are The Potential Risks Of Using A Car Charger For Charging An ATV Battery And How Can I Avoid Them?

There are some potential risks associated with using a car charger for charging an ATV battery. Here are some of the risks and how to avoid them:

  • Overcharging: Overcharging your ATV battery can lead to damage, overheating, and even a fire. To avoid overcharging, make sure you are using a charger that is compatible with your battery and follow the manufacturer’s instructions for charging.
  • Short-circuiting: Short-circuiting can occur if the positive and negative terminals of the battery are connected, causing a spark or fire. To avoid short-circuiting, always connect the charger to the battery terminals correctly and ensure that the battery is clean and free of corrosion.
  • Explosions and fires: Charging a battery can cause it to release flammable gasses, which can lead to explosions or fires if the area is not well-ventilated. To avoid explosions and fires, charge your battery in a well-ventilated area, and never charge a damaged or leaking battery.
  • Electrical shock: Working with batteries and chargers can be dangerous, and there is a risk of electrical shock if you’re not careful. To avoid electrical shock, always wear protective gear, work in a dry area, and avoid touching the battery terminals with your bare hands.
  • Damaging the charger: Using a charger that is not compatible with your battery can damage the charger, and potentially cause it to malfunction or fail. To avoid damaging the charger, ensure that you are using a charger that is compatible with your battery and follow the manufacturer’s instructions for charging.

What Types Of Car Chargers Are Suitable For Charging ATV Batteries (e.g., Trickle, Smart, or Manual Chargers)?

When choosing a car charger for your ATV battery, consider the battery’s voltage and amperage requirements, as well as the charger’s compatibility with your battery. You should also consider your charging needs, such as how quickly you need to charge the battery and how frequently you use your ATV.

  • Trickle Chargers: Trickle chargers are a simple type of charger that delivers a low, steady charge to the battery over a long period. They are generally affordable and easy to use, but they can take a long time to charge the battery and may not be suitable for deeply discharged batteries.
  • Smart Chargers: Smart chargers are more advanced than trickle chargers and have built-in safety features that prevent overcharging and overheating. They can automatically adjust the charging rate based on the battery’s charge level and can charge the battery more quickly than a trickle charger.
  • Manual Chargers: Manual chargers are similar to Smart chargers, but they require more user input. With a manual charger, you’ll need to monitor the battery’s charge level and adjust the charging rate manually to prevent overcharging or undercharging.

Can I Use A Car Charger To Charge Other Types Of Batteries, Like Motorcycles Or Lawn Mower Batteries?

Yes, you can use a car charger to charge other types of batteries, like motorcycle or lawn mower batteries, as long as the voltage and amperage requirements of the battery and the charger match.

However, it’s important to note that not all car chargers are compatible with all types of batteries, and using an incompatible charger can damage your battery or even cause a fire.

  • Check the voltage and amperage requirements: Check the voltage and amperage requirements of the battery and the car charger to ensure they match. Using a charger that is too powerful can damage the battery while using a charger that is not powerful enough can take a long time to charge the battery or not charge it at all.
  • Check the charging time: Check the charging time required for your battery and ensure that the car charger can provide enough power to charge the battery within the required time frame.
  • Use a Smart charger: Consider using a Smart charger that has built-in safety features. These chargers can monitor the battery’s charge level and automatically adjust the charging rate to prevent overcharging or overheating.
  • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions: Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for charging your battery. This will help ensure that you are using the charger correctly and prevent any damage to your battery or charger.
  • Monitor the charging process: Keep an eye on the charging process and make sure the charger is functioning correctly. Check the battery periodically to see if it is getting too hot or if the charger is making unusual noises.
useful, tips, make, your, battery

Conclusion:

Hopefully, now you know how to charge an ATV battery with a car charger. Charging your ATV battery using a car charger is a practical and resourceful solution, particularly when a dedicated ATV battery charger is unavailable.

By following the steps outlined in this guide, you can successfully charge your ATV battery and get back to enjoying your off-road adventures. However, it’s essential to remember that using a charger specifically designed for ATV batteries is always the best option to ensure optimal charging and prolong the battery’s life.

If you frequently find yourself needing to charge your ATV battery, consider investing in a dedicated ATV battery charger for the safest and most efficient charging experience.

I am M Monerujjaman. I’m a professional blogger and the Founder of this blog – autosbible.com. I have an entrepreneurial spirit, looking for an opportunity to utilize my diverse Knowledge, high skills, and managerial work experience. I love to write tips, tricks, helpful guides article and publish on this blog. I’m Automotive Technology, Auto News enthusiast. I’ve been reviewing Automotive Tools, Automotive Parts and Automotive Engine Performance for over many years. And I like nothing better than to be exploring new places in a great vehicle.

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Why Your ATV Battery Keeps Dying?

You’re probably wondering why your ATV battery keeps dying? It can be very frustrating to go out to your quad and see that it won’t start.

The reason why your battery dies is mostly to do with it sitting for too long. Unlike your car which you drive daily, your ATV may sit for weeks or months and the battery will go flat.

There are a few simple things you can do to keep your ATV battery from dying along with other things you need to keep in mind.

How To Keep ATV Battery From Dying?

To keep your ATV battery from dying there are two things you can do.

  • Drive it more often.
  • Or keep a Smart battery charger on it when it’s going to sit for months.

The biggest reason ATV batteries die is that they’re not being used enough.

The battery needs to be kept active and unless you have the engine running or the battery hooked up to a Smart charger the battery is slowly sulfating and dying. The sulfation won’t be noticeable for months but once it gets to a certain point the battery can’t come back and needs to be replaced. It’s just the nature of lead-acid batteries.

So if your ATV is going to be sitting for months it’s best to keep a Smart battery charger on it. It’s also best to remove the battery from the ATV when charging it.

Can You Jump An ATV Battery?

It’s best to avoid jumping your ATV battery from your car or truck.

Jumping your ATV battery from your vehicle while it’s running can fry the computer on your ATV. The batteries and alternators in cars or trucks are much larger and output more power than the electrical systems many ATVs can handle.

I repeat – Don’t jump your ATV battery with a Car or Truck!

You can, however, jump your ATV battery from a portable jump starter. Portable jump starters have come a long way, I personally have a “batteryless” one that charges off a dead battery. Yes, I know it sounds crazy but it’s a real thing and it works as shown in the video below. You can buy this jump starter here.

Be careful of the jumper wires when connected to a battery, they carry a lot of current and can really hurt someone who doesn’t know what they’re doing. If you don’t feel comfortable doing it then contact someone else with more experience like your local dealership.

Riding the ATV will NOT Charge Your Battery

Running an ATV or Side By Side for a bit will not charge a dead battery.

Your car uses an alternator that charges the battery when running, but your ATV and Side By Sides use a stator. A stator is there to maintain a charge to power whatever is currently running and nothing more. Where an alternator is made to charge up a battery and keep it charged. The stator will keep the battery active and stop sulfation, but it’s not meant to charge the battery.

So riding around for a bit will not help much at all. Sure it will seem like the battery charged after riding for a bit but come the next day or a few hours the battery will be dead again.

No Power? Solar Charger?

If you don’t have power where you keep your ATV you can still keep the battery from dying.

Get yourself a 12-volt solar charger like this one here and keep it on the battery when you’re not going to ride for months.

When it comes to solar chargers you want one that is 1 to 5-watts. Do not get a solar charger that is over 5-watts or you run the risk of destroying your battery.

If All Else Fails

If all else fail then you need to contact your dealer or local mechanic to see what is going on. The battery could be bad and the only way to know is to remove it and test it with a load tester.

You could have other problems like a rectifier is bad. A bad rectifier would mean the power your stator produces is not getting sent to the battery.

I’ve also seen fuses that go to the charging system fail too and that be the reason why an ATV battery won’t charge.

At this point, if you don’t know what you’re doing you need to take it to a dealership to get the problem worked out.

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