10000Amh power bank. 10000amh power bank

NITECORE NB10000 Power Bank Review

The NITECORE NB10000 Power Bank competes with similar 10,000 mAh power banks in performance, though its lower weight and slim size make it easier to pack.

Our Verdict

Save time. Get access to brief summaries of our reviews so you can browse and make decisions more efficiently.

Pros

  • Lightweight and small for a 10,000 mAh power bank
  • Supports simultaneous use of both ports
  • Low current mode handy for trickle charging low-power devices

Cons

  • LED indicators look only halfway full when unit’s fully charged
  • Sharp corners can catch on loose fabric
  • Only rechargeable via USB-C

Full Review

There are so many power banks in the market that it’s sometimes easy to forget they’re all built differently. Look a bit closer, though, and you’ll begin to see the nuances. Take, for example, size and capacity. For a given capacity, each model from each brand can differ wildly in size. Because the truth is, size and capacity are two different things, and it’s up to brands how to balance the two while keeping other features in mind.

In this review, we’re looking at a very good example of how this works out. Specifically, how a power bank can be so small and lightweight while packing so much capacity.

NITECORE’s NB10000 doesn’t look too impressive right out of the gate. It has two ports, a power button, and a slim carbon fiber body. You’d be forgiven for thinking that this power bank is only 6,000 or 7,000 mAh. It’s actually a 10,000 mAh unit, however, and at just 150 g, it’s one of the densest power banks we’ve tested, at the cost of the extra frills found with some other power banks.

The Rundown

Reading the LEDs can be somewhat confusing since they are all located on one side of the button, and only three of them indicate charge level. We sometimes get the wrong impression that the unit is only half-full since three LEDs only span half the length of the button. It’s not, though, and we had to get used to this odd design choice to avoid overcharging the unit. You can also double-tap the button to turn off the LEDs altogether.

The good news is that NITECORE’s moved the LEDs beside the power button on the newer version of the NB10000. It’s now much easier to read, and we wish it came out this way in the first place.

Charging the NB10000 is done through the USB-C port. This port supports two-way USB Power Delivery (18W input and 20W output on the newest version). Meanwhile, the USB-A port only supports 18W output. Both ports, however, support Quick Charge 3.0. If you decide to use both ports simultaneously, the output is capped at 15W (5V3A). You can also charge the NB10000 while using it to charge another device. All in all, it’s a fair amount of charging functionality for a power bank of this size.

As for the low current mode, that’s designed for low current devices like smartwatches and wireless headphones—devices that generally don’t require a ton of power. To activate, simply tap and hold the power button.

As the name suggests, the NB10000 has a mAh rating of about 10,000. Doing some rough back-of-a-napkin math, that’s worth about three charges for either a Samsung Galaxy S22 (3,700 mAh) or Apple iPhone 13 Pro (3,095 mAh). If you’re toting a higher-end device, that’s two charges for a Galaxy S22 (4,500 mAh) or iPhone 13 Pro Max (4,352 mAh).

Your mileage may vary since power transfer isn’t a hundred percent efficient in the real world, but you can get quite close. NITECORE is quite conservative in their own estimates, only quoting two charges for an iPhone 13 Pro and 1.5 charges for a Huawei P50 (4,100 mAh).

Packability

The most impressive feature of the NB10000 has to be its size. We’ve seen plenty of power banks smaller than this, but none really match it in terms of power density. We’ll get to the comparisons later. For now, see how it packs easily into our tech pouch.

It’s an easy fit even for an already-packed tech pouch such as ours. The only problem is how the NB10000 is shaped: it’s a very boxy power bank. Its corners are relatively sharp, and they can catch on soft fabrics or loose threads. Think of stretchy mesh typically found in tech pouches, loose shirts, and worn-out pants s—these will probably snag on the NB10000 sooner or later.

On the other hand, we like that NITECORE pretty much went as minimal as possible with the NB10000’s design. There are no frills like a curvy chassis or shiny trim added solely for the sake of styling. Yes, the body is carbon fiber, but that’s as much about keeping the weight down as it is about the looks. Plus, it is IPX5 rated, so it also has good water resistance.

For the record, we’re not quite fond of how the carbon fiber finish looks, but it is what it is.

Quick Comparison

Now’s the part where we actually see how the NB10000 stacks up against the competition. We’ve gathered two power banks with a size or capacity, namely the Anker PowerCore Lite 10000 mAh and the Satechi Quatro Wireless Power Bank. We’ve also thrown in the Futurizta Tech Pixy Mini, one of our go-to power banks due to its exceptionally compact size.

NITECORE NB10000: 10,000 mAh / 150 g = 66.7 mAh/g Futurizta Tech Pixy Mini: 5,000 mAh / 98 g = 51.0 mAh/g Anker PowerCore Lite 10000mAh: 10,000 mAh / 216 g = 46.3 mAh/g Satechi Quatro Wireless Power Bank: 10,000 mAh / 268 g = 37.3 mAh/g

The figures speak for themselves, with the NB10000 being the clear winner in terms of sheer power density. Of course, the other battery banks have their merits in extra features the NB10000 doesn’t have. For example, while Satechi’s Quatro may come off as the worst, it also features two wireless charging spots.

Features-wise, the NB10000 does come off a little modest. Save for the low current mode, it doesn’t boast blazing fast wired charging speeds, nor does it have wireless charging. There are no built-in flashlights, nor is there a digital readout. You’ll be hard pressed to find branding even—and that’s okay.

For straight-up packing as much power as you can while minimizing space occupied, the NB10000 is a clear-cut winner in our book. Sure, the sharp corners and carbon fiber finish may be cons, but its charging potential is a compelling selling point for any digital nomad.

Things You Need to Know Before Buying A Power Bank

Back in 2001, the prototype of a power bank appeared in CES. Since then, the power bank market has grown phenomenally and today, you can find hundreds of different brands on the market. There are so many to choose from, with capacities ranging from 500mAh to 30,000mAh, single or multiple USB ports, with or without a flashlight, etc. Earlier this year, several mobile phone manufacturers including Xiaomi, Samsung and Nokia launched their wireless power banks, making the market even more competitive.

The choice is bewildering, and it’s not like you can just ‘fish a power bank out of the sea’. Yes ok, there are lots of tips and guides out there, but today we are going to see how the tech gurus make their choice. You might even get a fringe benefit.

What Does A Quality Power Bank Look Like?

The easiest and quickest way to judge the quality of a power bank is to check the quality of its case. What materials are used? How well is it designed? Are there any signs of damage? Is the button easy to press?

A quality power bank should have:

1) A clean and complete surface, nothing out of shape. There should be no signs of mechanical damage, no corrosion on any of the connectors.

2) Clear markings about the power ratings, avoid anything blurry that you cannot read.

3) Make sure any buttons and lights work correctly.

It Should Have These Numbers

Every power bank should have markings which clearly state what the power ratings are. That will help you to understand if it can properly charge your phone or not.

1) The basic information should be illustrated on the product or in the user manual; this usually includes the capacity, model number, product type, manufacturers’ information, etc.

2) The Rated input voltage/current and the output voltage/current information is fundamental. But what do these numbers mean? The rated input tells you the standard voltage that the power adapter can connect to so that it can charge the power bank.

If you lose the original power adapter, you could buy a third party one that matches instead of the original. The rated output has to match with the output voltage of the original power adapter for your phone. It’s not recommended to charge your phone with a power bank that has different voltages; otherwise, you may well damage your phone.

3) How many times can the full power bank charge my phone? That’s the question a lot of you will want to know. Usually, that sort of information is not written on the power bank, but with rated capacity and cell/battery rated energy, you can do the math yourself. Don’t worry. We will get to that later.

4) Last but not least, the markings about safety certification are also significant. Most electronics products will bear signs of CE, RoHs and FCC. CE and RoHs are required if the product is sold in the EU; while FCC is mandatory for US market. Safety is somehow guaranteed if you see those marks on the power bank.

You will probably find other markings too, such as environmental information. If you are passionate about these environmental factors, you might want to choose a power bank with a ‘cyclic regeneration mark’ which means that it is recyclable.

Know the Conversion Game of Power Banks

You probably know that bigger capacity is better since it can provide more energy. The thing is, there are two different types of capacity: battery capacity and rated capacity. What you usually see on power banks are the battery capacity. What’s the difference between those two numbers? Let’s read on.

1) How many times can the power bank charge your phone?

If a power bank is marked as 10,000mAh 3.8V (38Wh), that means its battery capacity is 10,000mAh, the voltage of the battery core is 3.8V, and the battery core energy is 38Wh.

Rated capacity (mAh): Also known as nameplate capacity, is the least output capacity under the rated voltage and current.

For example, the rated capacity of a power bank is 7,000mAh (TYP5.1V 1A), that means the minimum output capacity of the power bank is 7,000mAh in the charging process with 5.1V and 1A output standard.

Conversion efficiency: This indicates the value difference between the battery core energy and rated capacity.

A power bank has a battery capacity as 10,000mAh; the battery core voltage is 3.8V which will increase to 5.1V when it’s charging a phone. So, in theory, its output capacity is:

10,000 3.8 / 5.1 = 7,450mAh

The rated capacity is 7,000mAh (TYP5.1V 1A), so the rated conversion efficiency is:

7,000 / 7,450 = 93.96%

In other words, the energy conversion efficiency is about 93.96%, with a 5.1V 1A output standard. About 6.04% of the power is lost in the conversion. If you use professional tools to test the rated output capacity, the result would not be too different. The conversion efficiency of most of the power banks on the market are between 80~90%. Therefore, a power bank with 10,000 battery capacity has about 6,000~7,000 rated output capacity.

Charging rate: 7,000mAh (rated capacity of the power bank) / 3,110mAh (capacity of the iPhone 11 battery) =2.25

Therefore, it can charge your iPhone 11 twice at best.

2) How long will the power bank last?

The lifespan of a power bank depends on two things: how well the power bank is made and how much you use it. The number of charge-discharge cycles, decided by the battery core and other vital components, varies amongst power banks. Typically, this is between 300 ~ 1,000 cycles and if you want my advice, you should definitely avoid any power bank that has less than 500 charge cycles.

Say, the power bank has 500 charge cycles, and you fully charge it once per day on average, then how long it will last? We can work that out with the following simple formula:

Power bank lifespan = Charge cycles charging rate / using rate

Where ‘Using rate’ is the number of times you charge the power bank fully in a day.

As mentioned above, for a 10,000mAh power bank, its charging rate is about 2.25. If it has 500 charging cycles, its lifespan is:

500 2.25 / 1 = 1125 days = 3.08 years

But where can these charging cycles be found, you may ask? The test of cycle life involves specific equipment, so for now, we’ll just have to skip that.

But, if you really want to know, ask the seller before you purchase. Even if you don’t get an answer, as you can see from the above example, the power bank will last longer if it has more capacity and a lower use rate. So, it makes sense to go for a big power bank and use it slowly, that way, you should be able to keep for a couple of years if not more.

3) How long does it take to charge the power bank or the phone fully?

Now comes the easy part. The charging time depends on the capacity of the powered device (PD) and its input current which equals the output current of the power sourcing device (PSD)

Charging time = battery capacity / actual input current.

Take a 10,000mAh power bank to demonstrate. Its rated input is 5V/2A, so if you use a 5V/1A power adapter to charge it, its actual input current is 1A=1,000mAh. 10,000mAh /1,000mAh=10 hours. If you use a 5V/2A power adapter, it takes 5 hours to fully charge the power bank: 10,000mAh / 2A (2,000mAh) = 5 hours.

Same for charging the phone. If your phone battery has 4,000mAh capacity, and the maximum output current of the power bank is 2.5A (input current for the phone is 2.5A) then it takes about 1.6 hours to fully charge your phone with the power bank.

How Safe is the Power Bank?

You cannot be too more careful with electronic devices, including power banks. They should have protection mechanisms to prevent any danger caused by electricity.

There are several underlying protection mechanisms: over-current protection, under-voltage protection, short-circuit protection, over-temperature protection and overvoltage protection. This information can usually be found in the user manual.

What’s the Purpose of Power Banks?

By now, you are probably a power bank expert to some extent. But can you count on all those numbers to consider a purchase? Not really. Knowing everything about a power bank can help you decide the quality, but the quality is not the only standard to define a “good” product. It also has to do what you want.

Yes, high-capacity power banks have a longer lifespan and higher charging rate, however, a high capacity also means a bigger size. Do you want to carry a bulky phone power bank in your small bag? Some of you will be shaking your head. If you want to carry an emergency power supply for your phone when you are out shopping, then a small-sized power bank is best. However, if you are a selfie addict, an extra 30% energy from the power bank may not be enough for your day out. You see, everyone has different needs.

Therefore, the first step to select a power bank is to figure out what kind of power bank you want, then compare power banks of the same type with what you’ve learned above.

If you happen to be looking for a power bank for an emergency power supply, check out this recommendation –

PITAKA MagEZ Battery Pack, a MagSafe compatible wireless charging power bank.

The MagEZ Battery Pack is a perfectly formed, small-sized, wireless power bank with 4000mAh capacity that can provide an additional 60% energy for your iPhone 14, perfect for your everyday carry and emergency use. With magnets embedded within, it matches flawlessly with MagSafe phone cases. It can auto attach and align with your iPhone 12, iPhone 13, and iPhone 14 series, safely and securely.

importantly, the MagSafe battery pack is compatible with our MagEZ Slider, a multi-device charging station that can work as a phone stand and charges your phone and Airpods. With the Slider, you can slide the power bank in the dock when it’s not used, so you won’t misplace or forget to charge the power bank anymore.

In conclusion

You don’t have to be a tech guru to select what you want but, you should know the essential tech behind a power bank if you are going to buy one. Don’t be fooled by the salesman, do your research and you have a bigger chance to get a power bank that’s worth it. Nothing could go amiss.

0mAh to 120000mAh: What’s the Best Capacity for A Power Bank?

Yes, there are fixes to stop your phone, tablet, or laptop battery from draining fast. But not everyone wants to compromise. That’s why portable power banks or battery packs exist.

For those who are new to power banks or have difficulty deciding which kind to get, capacity is the first and foremost thing to consider because it determines how often you can charge your device.

Ever wondered what the best capacity for a power bank is?

What Do You Need to Know About Power Bank Capacity?

I once explained about the numbers printed on power banks. Capacity is one of those complicated technical terms. But the rule is simple: the actual capacity of a power bank is about 2/3 of the rated capacity. Part of the energy will be lost in the conversion and during charging.

Capacity typically measures in mAh (Milliamp Hours), like our smartphone batteries. The bigger the number is, the larger the capacity. A power bank with a 10000 mAh battery has a capacity of about 6000-7000 mAh. The iPhone 12 mini has a 2227 mAh battery. So one full charge of a 10000 mAh power bank can charge the iPhone 12 mini from 0 to 100% two or three times (7000 divided by 2227).

If a 10000 mAh power bank can barely charge your iPhone 12 mini twice, then probably it’s so poorly made that too much energy loss happens during charging, it has a low conversion efficiency or simply contains far less capacity than claimed.

1000 mAh Power Bank

Power banks with a capacity less than that of the regular smartphone are rarely seen nowadays. To many, they seem pointless, but those who are not addicted to handheld entertainment may love the idea of a backup battery pack that they can attach to their key chains or keep in their wallet.

4000~5000 mAh Power Bank

A power bank of about 4000 mAh should suffice in ensuring your phone lasts well over a day even if you’re a heavy phone user, given that most people don’t leave the house with a dead phone. Phone users welcome these kinds of power banks with good reason: sufficient capacity with portability. If you are looking for a portable power bank for your phone, you may want to look at those 4000-5000 mAh power banks that can fully, or almost fully, charge your device. They’re also very portable and convenient to carry.

7000 mAh Power Bank

If you’re going to places where you regularly rely on your phone, and it may be a while before you come across a wall charger, then a medium-capacity power bank is the best option. A power bank with a capacity of around 7,000 mAh can not only charge your phone once, but you can share it with other people or charge other small devices like earbuds.

10000 mAh Power Bank

The average battery capacity of a standard smartphone falls below 4,000 mAh. So, a power bank with a 10,000 mAh capacity (actual capacity 6,000-7,000 mAh) is enough to fully charge most handsets at least once and charge small phones like the iPhone 12 mini three times. The downside is that power banks of this size tend to be larger and heavier than your cell phone.

20000 mAh Power Bank

A power bank with a capacity of 12000 mAh is more than enough for a smartphone. You can even charge a tablet like the iPad mini (5124 mAh) or Samsung Galaxy Tab S7 (8000 mAh).

If you have the iPad Pro 2020 with a battery of nearly 10000 mAh, or a standard laptop, then a 20000 mAh power bank seems to be the best option. After charging your iPad Pro once, the power bank still has energy left for a smartphone.

20000 mAh Power Banks

Power banks with a capacity of over 20000 mAh are comparably expensive and sizeable. So, be careful if you see some power banks with an extremely high capacity and an unreasonable price tag. They can support all your portable devices for a day and tend to be used for camping or traveling.

120000 mAh Power Banks

These kinds of power banks are more like portable generators, capable of lasting for days. They are usually found in a car’s trunk and can charge appliances, such as a mini-fridge. They typically feature multiple charging ports to charge several devices simultaneously.

What is the Best Capacity for a Power Bank?

As you already know, the more capacity a power bank holds, the more it can provide. On the flip side, the more powerful a power bank is, the bulkier it is. They also require a longer charging time and may not be allowed on flights.

You can’t have it both ways.

So, the best capacity for a power bank depends on your needs.

For regular phone use or a daily commute, take a look at power banks between 4000-5000 mAh, which are portable and have adequate juice.

For phone users with unique needs or for particular scenarios, 7000-10000 mAh are good options. If you want a power bank mainly for your tablet or laptop, they’d better be above 10000 mAh.

You might be interested in:

Max10

Meet the jack of all devices, iGear Max10 power bank with cable comes with a major type of charging cable that can support multiple devices such as your iPhone, Android smartphones, earbuds, smartwatches and more.

You can avoid any battery drainage by simply making the max10 power bank your companion everywhere you travel and keep your device’s battery level in the green zone.

power, bank

Faster charging on the go

This power pack provides faster charging along with the option to charge from its four outputs which includes wire of iPhone, micro-USB, Type-C supported devices.

Move with Style

This power bank is light in weight and designed in such a way that you can easily carry and go anywhere you like.

Greater power, more responsibility

The max10 fast charging power bank comes with 10000mah juice, this can simultaneously charge your single or multiple devices on the go without any interruptions.

Model No iG-1213
Warranty Period 1 Year
Input Voltage (USB) 5V/2.0A
Input Voltage (Type C) 5V/2.0A
Output Voltage (Micro USB) 5V/2.4A
Output Voltage (Type C) 5V/2.4A
Output Voltage (Lightning) 5V/2.4A
Wattage 12W (max)
Connector Type 4 in 1 USB detachable cable, Lightning, Type. C, Micro USB
Net Weight 235 grams
Dimensions 14.6 cm × 6.8 cm x 1.8 cm
Battery 10000 mAh

Convenient Detachable Cable

The max10 power bank comes with a detachable cable design, allowing you to easily switch between different cable types (such as iPhone, micro-USB, and Type-C) based on your device’s charging needs.

All Rounder

With the Max10 power bank you get multiple outputs along with different types of cable to choose which one supports your device and can be easily charged with this powerful power bank.

FAQs

It takes 30 to 45 minutes to charge a smartphone. The charging duration depends upon the smartphone as well as the capability of the device which can be 12W or 65W.

It takes 4 to 5 hours to completely charge your power bank if the battery of the power bank is completely drained.

The iGear Max10 Power Bank comes with the power bank itself, a micro-USB cable for charging, and a user manual.

Depending upon the usage and charging device the power bank can last for at least two devices to get completely charged.

Yes, the power bank has the led light to indicate the battery juice it has and when there is no light it indicates that you need to charge the power bank.

The function of the power button is to turn-on the power bank and supply the power through the output of the power bank. It is a power saving button as without the button the power juice will automatically get drained without any use.

When your power bank gets fully charged you can see all the light in the power bank to be on without any blinking effect.

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power, bank

NITECORE NB10000 Power Bank Review

The NITECORE NB10000 Power Bank competes with similar 10,000 mAh power banks in performance, though its lower weight and slim size make it easier to pack.

Our Verdict

Save time. Get access to brief summaries of our reviews so you can browse and make decisions more efficiently.

Pros

  • Lightweight and small for a 10,000 mAh power bank
  • Supports simultaneous use of both ports
  • Low current mode handy for trickle charging low-power devices

Cons

  • LED indicators look only halfway full when unit’s fully charged
  • Sharp corners can catch on loose fabric
  • Only rechargeable via USB-C

Full Review

There are so many power banks in the market that it’s sometimes easy to forget they’re all built differently. Look a bit closer, though, and you’ll begin to see the nuances. Take, for example, size and capacity. For a given capacity, each model from each brand can differ wildly in size. Because the truth is, size and capacity are two different things, and it’s up to brands how to balance the two while keeping other features in mind.

In this review, we’re looking at a very good example of how this works out. Specifically, how a power bank can be so small and lightweight while packing so much capacity.

NITECORE’s NB10000 doesn’t look too impressive right out of the gate. It has two ports, a power button, and a slim carbon fiber body. You’d be forgiven for thinking that this power bank is only 6,000 or 7,000 mAh. It’s actually a 10,000 mAh unit, however, and at just 150 g, it’s one of the densest power banks we’ve tested, at the cost of the extra frills found with some other power banks.

The Rundown

We’ll start with a tour of the hardware features around the outside. Up at the top are two USB ports—one USB-A and one USB-C—and a physical power button with embedded LED indicators. There are four LED indicators in total, with the one on the far right indicating when it’s in low current mode, while the rest indicate charge status. It’s a pretty basic setup, visually speaking, but the NB10000’s updated version 2 does have yellow accent coloring around the ports.

Reading the LEDs can be somewhat confusing since they are all located on one side of the button, and only three of them indicate charge level. We sometimes get the wrong impression that the unit is only half-full since three LEDs only span half the length of the button. It’s not, though, and we had to get used to this odd design choice to avoid overcharging the unit. You can also double-tap the button to turn off the LEDs altogether.

The good news is that NITECORE’s moved the LEDs beside the power button on the newer version of the NB10000. It’s now much easier to read, and we wish it came out this way in the first place.

Charging the NB10000 is done through the USB-C port. This port supports two-way USB Power Delivery (18W input and 20W output on the newest version). Meanwhile, the USB-A port only supports 18W output. Both ports, however, support Quick Charge 3.0. If you decide to use both ports simultaneously, the output is capped at 15W (5V3A). You can also charge the NB10000 while using it to charge another device. All in all, it’s a fair amount of charging functionality for a power bank of this size.

As for the low current mode, that’s designed for low current devices like smartwatches and wireless headphones—devices that generally don’t require a ton of power. To activate, simply tap and hold the power button.

As the name suggests, the NB10000 has a mAh rating of about 10,000. Doing some rough back-of-a-napkin math, that’s worth about three charges for either a Samsung Galaxy S22 (3,700 mAh) or Apple iPhone 13 Pro (3,095 mAh). If you’re toting a higher-end device, that’s two charges for a Galaxy S22 (4,500 mAh) or iPhone 13 Pro Max (4,352 mAh).

Your mileage may vary since power transfer isn’t a hundred percent efficient in the real world, but you can get quite close. NITECORE is quite conservative in their own estimates, only quoting two charges for an iPhone 13 Pro and 1.5 charges for a Huawei P50 (4,100 mAh).

Packability

The most impressive feature of the NB10000 has to be its size. We’ve seen plenty of power banks smaller than this, but none really match it in terms of power density. We’ll get to the comparisons later. For now, see how it packs easily into our tech pouch.

It’s an easy fit even for an already-packed tech pouch such as ours. The only problem is how the NB10000 is shaped: it’s a very boxy power bank. Its corners are relatively sharp, and they can catch on soft fabrics or loose threads. Think of stretchy mesh typically found in tech pouches, loose shirts, and worn-out pants s—these will probably snag on the NB10000 sooner or later.

On the other hand, we like that NITECORE pretty much went as minimal as possible with the NB10000’s design. There are no frills like a curvy chassis or shiny trim added solely for the sake of styling. Yes, the body is carbon fiber, but that’s as much about keeping the weight down as it is about the looks. Plus, it is IPX5 rated, so it also has good water resistance.

For the record, we’re not quite fond of how the carbon fiber finish looks, but it is what it is.

Quick Comparison

Now’s the part where we actually see how the NB10000 stacks up against the competition. We’ve gathered two power banks with a size or capacity, namely the Anker PowerCore Lite 10000 mAh and the Satechi Quatro Wireless Power Bank. We’ve also thrown in the Futurizta Tech Pixy Mini, one of our go-to power banks due to its exceptionally compact size.

power, bank

NITECORE NB10000: 10,000 mAh / 150 g = 66.7 mAh/g Futurizta Tech Pixy Mini: 5,000 mAh / 98 g = 51.0 mAh/g Anker PowerCore Lite 10000mAh: 10,000 mAh / 216 g = 46.3 mAh/g Satechi Quatro Wireless Power Bank: 10,000 mAh / 268 g = 37.3 mAh/g

The figures speak for themselves, with the NB10000 being the clear winner in terms of sheer power density. Of course, the other battery banks have their merits in extra features the NB10000 doesn’t have. For example, while Satechi’s Quatro may come off as the worst, it also features two wireless charging spots.

Features-wise, the NB10000 does come off a little modest. Save for the low current mode, it doesn’t boast blazing fast wired charging speeds, nor does it have wireless charging. There are no built-in flashlights, nor is there a digital readout. You’ll be hard pressed to find branding even—and that’s okay.

For straight-up packing as much power as you can while minimizing space occupied, the NB10000 is a clear-cut winner in our book. Sure, the sharp corners and carbon fiber finish may be cons, but its charging potential is a compelling selling point for any digital nomad.

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